Question about the United States Constitution?

I was told that there is a section of the United States Constitution that states if the government isn't doing their job then the people are to start a revolution, or something along those lines. Is this true? If so which section?

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    As stated in many answers, it is the Declaration of Independence that affirms the right of all people to determine the form of government that suits them. In every instance throughout history, governments have subverted the rights of the governed in favor of securing more power over the populous. The Declaration asserts the right and inescapable responsibility of individuals to change their government when "in the course of human events" such expansion becomes unbearable - by force when necessary.

    These principles were not devised by the Founders, they grew out of the Enlightenment. John Locke expounded on them in his Two Treatises on Government in the 1600s and several other philosophers also contributed to the way of thinking.

    Under the principles of Natural Law on which the US was founded, the "creator" whatever you believe that to be, endowed humans with 3 rights. Those are life, liberty, and private property. Life, is self explanatory. Liberty is the freedom to apply your life to the world around you for your own benefit or in the service of others. Private property is the compensation deemed adequate by the individual exchanging their life and liberty through labor.

    Free people created governments for the sole purpose of protecting these rights. Government simply exists to make sure no one violates the rights of others. Government cannot violate the property rights of one individual without violating their life and liberty because the property they accumulate was exchanged for a part of their life and liberty.

    The fact that so few seem to understand the evolution of this line of thinking up to the founding of the US is an indictment of our modern educational system and the core reason why so many are willing to acquiesce to a strong federal government not bound by the Constitution.

    gosam777 - the Constitution gives no individual or state rights. It is a list of responsibilities granted BY the people and states TO the federal government. Rights are endowed by the creator and cannot be created or destroyed by governments. Armed rebellion is retained by the people and states and the second amendment is the protector of their ability to mount a serious resistance. There is no question the effort would be futile should the federal forces choose to follow orders to suppress it, but that factor does not diminish the fact that the right is retained.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Giving full credit where credit is due to the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution of the United States was and still is the most revolutionary document of all time! Nothing before or since even comes close. With out bogging down in details, the Constitution asserts and codifies into Law that Power originates with the People. That We The People have the right to form a more perfect Union, the right to establish justice and domestic tranquility. That We the People have the right to provide for our common defense, general welfare, and to secure the blessings of liberty for ourselves and our posterity. At no time ever before had anyone since the Greeks even suggested such and even they didn't go this far! The Neo-Cons like to run on and on about this being a Christian Nation founded of Christian Principles but sorry, wrong answer! The Scriptures clearly establish the so-called 'Divine Right of Kings' but Our Constitution sweeps all that away in its Preamble! Revolutionary? Oh hell yea!

  • 4 years ago

    gosam777 - the Constitution gives no individual or state rights. It is a list of responsibilities granted BY the people and states TO the federal government. Rights are endowed by the creator and cannot be created or destroyed by governments. Armed rebellion is retained by the people and states and the second amendment is the protector of their ability to mount a serious resistance. There is no question the effort would be futile should the federal forces choose to follow orders to suppress it, but that factor does not diminish the fact that the right is retained.

  • 1 decade ago

    1st amendment gives you the right to assemble, protest, and petition the government, but not an armed revolution.

    http://www.usconstitution.net/const.html#Am1

    You may be thinking of Jefferson and some of the forefathers suggesting revolution and taking back the government if and when necessary.

    "God forbid we should ever be twenty years without such a rebellion.

    The people cannot be all, and always, well informed. The part which is

    wrong will be discontented, in proportion to the importance of the facts

    they misconceive. If they remain quiet under such misconceptions,

    it is lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. ...

    And what country can preserve its liberties, if its rulers are not

    warned from time to time, that this people preserve the spirit of

    resistance? Let them take arms. The remedy is to set them right as

    to the facts, pardon and pacify them. What signify a few lives lost

    in a century or two? The tree of liberty must be refreshed from

    time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants.

    It is its natural manure."

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    Trying to do that by force is called Sedition. There's a law against that.

    However, Amendment 10 says "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people."

    I'm not an attorney, so I can't advise you beyond what I've written here.

  • Amber
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I believe you're thinking of this part in the Declaration of Independence: "Whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.... it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security."

    According to that then yeah, if we the people felt that our government was not representing us, we have the right to overthrow the government peacefully and create a new one. But they made no mention of it in the Constitution, so no. The Constitution doesn't allow it, but we are in charge of who represents us, and we can vote them out or assemble peacefully if we don't like them.

  • Tyler
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    not the constitution... the declaration of independence...

    "When in the Course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation."

  • 1 decade ago

    The US Constitution says this:

    Amendment II

    "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the SECURITY OF A FREE STATE, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

    Meaning it's our job to keep this nation free....if the government intervenes in freedom it's our job to overthrow it.

    What you specifically referred to is the Declaration of Independence:

    When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

    We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. --That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. —Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government.

    Source(s): We need freedom back......Ron Paul 2012
  • 1 decade ago

    not the Constitution, but the Declaration of Independence

  • 1 decade ago

    The closest thing to anything like that is a Constitutional Convention.

    But we don't need one. We just need new leaders.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.