What was the Republican Southern Strategy?

Was it successful?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    An electoral strategy appealing to racism and racist parts of the voters to secure Republican victories.

    There is a direct connection between the Republican Party of today and the cultivation of racist and segregationist forces in the South. For most of the first half of the twentieth century, the Democratic Party incorporated the southern political establishment and defended its Jim Crow policies. However, as the national leadership of the Democrats moved to support civil rights legislation during the 1960s, the Republicans implemented a conscious strategy to capture the segregationist vote in the South. The 1964 Presidential campaign of Barry Goldwater openly appealed to these sentiments.

    In 1968, Richard Nixon ran for president on the basis of his “southern strategy,” which was a thinly disguised appeal to racism. Many prominent Democrats switched over to the Republicans during this period, without changing their racist views. These included figures such as former Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, from Mississippi, and the former North Carolina Senator, Jesse Helms.

    In the following decades, the Republican Party worked to expand its right-wing base by cultivating alongside racist forces the most reactionary forms of Christian fundamentalism. There was and remains a large degree of overlap between these components of the most active elements of the Republican Party’s base.

    In the aftermath of the mass movement for civil rights, which mobilized millions of black workers and youth with the support of substantial layers of the working class and middle class nationally, it was less and less possible to gain political office through open appeals to segregationism. Instead, the Republican Party evolved a sort of political code, in which opposition to welfare programs and advocacy of “states’ rights” took the place of overt defense of white supremacy.

    The political meaning of this language was clear to all involved. One incident demonstrates the method: Ronald Reagan’s decision to launch his 1980 general election campaign with an appearance at the Neshoba County Fair in Philadelphia, Mississippi, the site of the most notorious crime of the civil rights era, the murder of three young civil rights workers in 1964. When Reagan delivered a speech in which he declared, “I believe in states’ rights,” he was giving his tacit support to the maintenance of the social and economic oppression of the black population, even while the outward forms of legalized racism had been eliminated.

    It was successful for almost half a century

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Learn Personal Defence http://netint.info/UltimateSelfDefenseGuide
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    The South was called the Solid South before the 1968 General Election because they always voted democrat in Presidential Elections. After the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act were passed in 1965 under the sponsorship of Democratic President Johnson who signed them into law (with Northern Democratic and some Republican support) the Republicans decided to go after Southern voters disillusioned with the Democratic Party. Nixon used it to help him win the 1968 election. After this many Southern democrats switched to the Republican Party. -- Strom Thurmond, Jesse Helms, Trent Lott etc.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No -- despite the efforts of Republicans who voted based on qualifications of a candidate, the Democrats still elected a President merely because of the color of his skin

    97 + % of All Blacks did vote against All White Candidates and for the Black Candidate

    If 97 + of All Whites had voted against the Black Candidate ( which they did not ) and for the White Candidates ( which they did not ) .....The 3 Racist Bigots.....Farrakhan + Sharpton + Jackson would be marching down the street screaming " RACISM ! "

    The bottom line is that Barack Obama wouldn't have been elected County Clerk, much less President, if he was White

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The one that swept Republicans out of power? Why yes, I would say that most Democrats considered it "successful"!

  • 4 years ago

    Haven't considered this

  • 1 decade ago

    Social conservatism. Yes, I think it is successful and has not anything to do with race. I don't know if I would call it a strategy, though. The fact is that Southerners have strong family and Christian traditions. Kind of like the whole country used to have.

    Success isn't all about winning elections.

    Source(s): lol Silly me always thinking libs want a real answer. It's real simple, people. Personal responsibility costs everyone less money. Some don't want to pay for the ill-conceived choices of others. JGF, that's crap.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    In regards to what? lol you are reaching this morning.

    I repeat.

    George Wallace

    Bill Clinton "THIS GUY WOULD HAVE BEEN SERVING US COFFEE" bill to teddy

    Joe Biden

    Barbara Boxer

    etc etc.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    What's the strategy of the black race? Was it successful? All I see are inner city cesspools and self-genocide. And of course, the first black president -- who went to a racist church. Typical.

    Look at this pathetic little obsessed Belgian guy. Sheesh.

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This is weird

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