What is the real meaning of St. Patrick's Day?

I have a lot of Irish in my blood on both sides of my fam, and then either my great granddad or my my great great granddad actually came from Ireland, and i just was interested in my heritage and stuff about it

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  • 1 decade ago
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    St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity's most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Many of the stories traditionally associated with St. Patrick, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false, the products of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling. St. Patrick's Day is celebrated on March 17, his religious feast day and the anniversary of his death in the fifth century. The Irish have observed this day as a religious holiday for over a thousand years. St. Patrick is the most commonly recognised of the patron saints of Ireland.

    St. Patrick was born as Maewyn Succat during the fourth century in Britain. His parents were very wealthy. His father was also a Christian deacon for tax incentive reasons. When Maewyn was about sixteen his family and their home was attacked by Irish raiders. Maewyn was kidnapped and forced to become a slave working as a shepherd in County Mayo in Ireland. It was during his time as a slave that he turned to God. He had a dream one night to escape the next day and travel back home to Britain. The next day he did just that and travelled the 200 miles back home to Britain. Once he returned, Maewyn had another religious dream. An angel told him to become a missionary and spread Christianity back in Ireland. He then spent the next fifteen years training to become a priest and chose Patrick as his Christian Saint name. In 432 AD he went back to Ireland as a priest. He tried to convert the Irish people from a Pagan polytheistic religion that worshipped the sun and the moon to Christianity. He also created and taught at many schools along Ireland's west coast. One of his teaching methods included using the shamrock to explain the Holy Trinity (the father, the son, and the Holy Spirit) to the Irish people. After nearly thirty years of teaching and spreading God's word he died on March 17th 461 AD. Soon after his death the country of Ireland decided to remember his death with a day of his own and thus St. Patrick's Day was born.

    Originally the color associated with St. Patrick was blue not green. However over the years the color green and its association with St. Patrick's day grew. Green ribbons and shamrocks were worn in celebration of St Patrick's Day as early as the 17th century. He is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pre-Christian Irish, and the wearing and display of shamrocks and shamrock-inspired designs have become a ubiquitous feature of the day. Then in 1798 in hopes of making a political statement Irish soldiers wore full green uniforms on March 17th in hopes of catching attention with their unusual fashion gimmick. The phrase "the wearing of the green", meaning to wear a shamrock on one's clothing, derives from the song of the same name.

    Source(s): American/Irish
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  • vuong
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    yet another concept is that it is the day that St Patrick and his fellow christians tried to kill off the Pagans that have been in eire - for this reason the story of "St Patrick utilising the snakes out of eire". there exchange into by no skill any snakes in eire... the waters are too chilly for any snakes emigrate to that section (New Zealand additionally has no snakes and that's against the regulation to transport any to those places). The rumor is that St Patrick observed as on his god and the floor unfolded and swallowed the druids. the only issue with this tale is the obtrusive pagan symbolism throughout eire even after St Patrick. some thing else i got here upon exciting approximately St Patricks day, from some acquaintances I easily have that moved to eire. they do no longer celebrate it there. some could observe it in the event that they think approximately St Patrick their consumer saint, yet previous that, St Patrick isn't known like that for the duration of eire. in basic terms between Christians in u.s. is he glorified in this form.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Love the question. We're celebrating (on the anniversary of his death) how Saint Patrick changed Ireland forever. By driving out the serpents (the Pagan religion), Saint Patrick changed the course of Ireland. Who knows where we'd be now. We're thankful for Saint Patrick's intervention on our behalf. If you tried to compare it to American culture, where would America be had George Washington not taken the reins of control and steered your great country in the right direction? Who knows. But certainly, America would not be the same. Hope this helps.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It celebrates St. Patrick bringing christianity to Ireland, not driving out snakes, there weren't any to drive out in the first place, so that's merely a myth.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The real meaning? It's not Christmas.

    It's simply a day to celebrate St. Patrick. He brought Christianity to Ireland. That is all there is to it.

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  • Kevin
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    For more information on the real meaning of St. Patrick's Day, why don't you check out the History of the holiday? http://blog.forrent.com/holidays/history-of-st-pat...

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  • 1 decade ago

    And here I was under the impression that St Patrick chased the snakes outa ireland...

    Tim 'O thee

    :o)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Well i am i irish and traditionally st. Patricks day is a day to honour st patrick when he drove all snakes out of ireland. It also it to celebrate him preaching Catholicism in ireland. It is celebrated all over the world as a day to honour ireland and where Ireland's national colour(green). Here in ireland it is a national day off and most people celebrate it by watching the st. Patricks day parade and then going to the pub for a few pints of Guinness.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    In most American cities it means one is Irish - if just for 24 hrs. That's an amazing happy feeling, having something in common with everyone.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The day that Osyris died.

    Google more, there's a lot more to the 'green' also.

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