Access Shared Folder over different Subnet?

Access Shared Folder over different Subnet?

ok im not that knowledgeable with networking. i am setting up a desktop to act as file server in my office at work which is connected to the network. everyone one in my section can see it but when i log on the network in other departments it cant be accessed. its ip is 192.168.17.155 and all computers in my section have ip starting with 192.168.17.xxx and they are all connected to a default gateway 192.168.17.1. if i got to maths the default gateway is 192.168.20.1 and all computers are 192.168.20.xxx. im sure this means they are on a different subnets. but how would i be able to acces the drive anywhere on the network?

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  • Adrian
    Lv 7
    10 years ago
    Best Answer

    To access across subnets, the default gateways have to pass traffic to each other. Since the 192.168.x.y addresses are not really route-able, you have issues (obviously).

    One option is to "open up" the netmask, all on the one LAN, so that those two subnets are within the same subnet (in other words, make the subnet larger than 256 addresses, like 1024 addresses).

    However, the issue remains, if the "gateway" is a proper router, it will not route any 192.168.x.y packets. Higher end routers, you may be able to specify static routes - to bridge them across.

    You may also be able to do this with a Linux based router(firewall), that allows more than one IP address per network card. Hence you can have more than one subnet on a network card, or add more NICs to expand the networking. For example, my home linux router has 192.168.1.x and 192.168.50.y on two different network cards, and I allow traffic between these two subnets (all locally). I can connect from one subnet to the other... However, to run such a firewall, you have to get familiar with Linux firewalls - there are lots of free ones out there...

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    The subnets shouldn't matter. As long as you have given yourself access to the share, that's all that's required.

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