Why are pinking shears called pinking shears? Where did the term originate?

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  • sd3r
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    pink from middle English, 'pynken', meaning to pierce or prick.

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  • tang
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Pinking Shears

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  • Maj
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    This is an interesting question ! Here is what I found in different spots on the net: Pinking means to decorate with a perforated pattern - cut in zigzag

    Middle English pingen, pinken, to push, prick, from Old English pyngan, from Latin pungere;

    Louise Austin of Whatcom, Washington, received United States patent number 489,406 on January 3, 1893 for "Pinking shears." The patent describes how "pinking scissors or shears" are superior to the existing tools at the time, "pinking irons" and "pinking cutters." The operation of the shears are described as "pinking" or "scalloping..

    Benjamin Luscalzo, of Chicago, Illinois, received United States patent number 2600036 on June 10, 1952 for his improvements to "pinking shears".

    Source(s): Curiosity - searched here and there on the web
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  • 1 decade ago

    The word "pink" means "pierce, stab, or make holes in," and comes from the Roman stem, "pinc-", and Latin, "pungere", meaning to pierce or prick.

    Originally used in the early 1300's, the similar word in French is "piquer" and in Spanish, "picar."

    This use of the word pink survives mainly in "pinking shears." I can't think of any other way it's used except for, of course, the color.

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  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/axChj

    "pinking" actually IS a name, meaning something like "nipping." As when you nip something in the bud. The word bud, there, is significant, since it refers to gardening, where pinking shears are used.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I haven't heard of that before,that's funny,long history maybe...

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/251397178658

    Are all the scissors with decorative edge all called pinking scissors?

    Like this one? The arc edge?

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  • 1 decade ago

    the cut edge resembles the dianthus plant, often referred to as "pinks".

    the the source below for more

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