Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsWinter SportsIce Skating · 10 years ago

In ice skating, what is the difference between an "axel" and a "lutz"?

I know both are a jump, but which is which, and how do I tell them apart??

4 Answers

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  • 10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The difference between the two is pretty easy to spot once you know what you are looking for!

    An axel rotates 1.5 - 3.5 times (single is 1.5, double is 2.5, triple is 3.5) in the air, starting from a forward outside edge for the takeoff, and landing on a backward outside edge. Axels are considered an edge jump, because the skater takes off by rolling up to the toe from an edge.

    Here is a video that explains an axel:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFGLGFv8Mu0

    Youtube thumbnail

    A lutz rotates 1 - 3 times (single is 1, double is 2, triple is 3), and it starts on a backward outside edge before the toe of the opposite foot is put in the ice to assist the takeoff. Like the axel, it lands on a backward outside edge. A lutz is considered a toe jump because of the toe-assist on the takeoff (so, you skate an edge and then place the opposite toe in), unlike the axel.

    Here is a video explaining the lutz jump:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNmTZlo0tc8

    Youtube thumbnail

    Hope this helps!

    Source(s): Skater for 14 years, coach for 10 years...see links above.
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Here is a really easy way to think about it. Axel is a forward entry jump {usually going across ice} and a Lutz is a backwards entry jump {usually going into the back corner of the rink}

    In more detail [when I'm talking about the jumps I'm usually the perspective of a right footed skater]

    Axel [classified as an edge jump]- Takes off on the left outside edge, jumping forward to complete {in a single axel} one and a half rotations to land on the right foot backwards

    Lutz [classified as a toe jump]- Takes off backwards on a left outside edge, with the right foot picking behind to propel the skater into the air {in a single Lutz} to complete one rotation and landing on the right foot.

    Hope this clarifies things.

    Source(s): Competitive skater for 13 years/ Skating judge for two years and counting.
  • 10 years ago

    An axel takes off from a forward edge. The skater does 1-1/2 revolutions in the air then lands on a back outside edge.

    http://www.sk8stuffmore.com/recog/axel_sarah.mpg

    The Lutz takes off from a backward outside edge, using the toerake of the opposite foot to vault into the air backwards. The skater does 1 full revolution in the air then lands on a back outside edge.

    http://www.sk8stuffmore.com/recog/lutz_dbl_js.mpg

    The Flip takes off from a backward INside edge, using the toerake of the opposite foot to vault into the air backwards. The skater does 1 full revolution in the air then lands on a back outside edge.

    http://www.sk8stuffmore.com/recog/flip_dbl_nikki.m...

    It's the takeoff that makes each jump different and more difficult. The forward takeoff of the axel requires an extra 1/2 revolution to land backwards. The back takeoffs of the other jumps all use different edges and/or toe assists, some more difficult than others.

    In the air, all jumps look the same: the skater holds a tight backspin position.

    They all land on the same back outside edge.

  • 10 years ago

    The lutz is a tricky little jump. You start off going backwards, then tap your toe pick into the ice and use it to propel yourself into the jump where you also turn either once, twice or three times, and land, again, on that landing foot.

    The axel is a quintessential figure skating jump. It's also the easiest to explain. You start off going forward, then just jump into the air and turn one and a half times in the air before landing.

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