blues song in AABA form?

i need a blues song with rhyming words in the AABA form for a music class

EX: when i left home the skies were cloudy and gray

when i left home the skies were cloudy and gray

lord knows how long it'll take me to find my way.

Update:

but like i have to make one up in that format with rhyming words...anyone got any good lyrics?

2 Answers

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  • Tidbit
    Lv 4
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Blues usually follows the 12-bar form. So musically speaking it's all A. AABA is a Jazz form. The B section usually modulates to a different key. I don't think actual Blues does that.

    There is a Robert Johnson song called "Red Hots" that has an AABA form. But it's really an old time Jazz progression, sung by RJ who is a blues composer. That particular song is not exactly Blues.

    In Rock, the A is the verse and the B is the chorus. It used to have different chords for the B just like in Jazz.

    To just have a repeating lyric line and then a counter lyric line doesn't make it AABA. The B has to be musically different. I disagree with your teacher. What he is looking for is not really AABA. Blues doesn't work that way.

    The last 4 bars of a 12-bar blues is the turnaround. It's really what he's talking about. It will contain the counter lyric line to balance the tune. But it goes back to the beginning, there is no last A. At best you could call it AAB. Pretty silly. I can see what he's doing, he wants you to be aware of the parts of music. But it's an invalid question. It ignores the musical reality of the idiom. Or it is a misuse of the concept of A and B sections. No musician would call the response line a B. You might have a chorus. But in blues it's the same chords as the A, so it's not really a B section.

  • 4 years ago

    I agree with St. Petersburg Native. It is more like A, B, A, C. The first and third group of 8 bars are similar (not identical) and the second and fourth are different. However, if you actually watch the musical, "Hello, Dolly!" there are more parts of the song than that.

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