Prominent democrats believe republicans are racist against black people, are they right?

Republicans ended slavery and had the majority votes of civil rights because they are racist? And so does that mean all of these african americans are racist against african americans? * Martin Luther King Jr. * Ken Blackwell, former Secretary of State of Ohio, former Ohio gubernatorial candidate * Keith... show more Republicans ended slavery and had the majority votes of civil rights because they are racist?

And so does that mean all of these african americans are racist against african americans?

* Martin Luther King Jr.
* Ken Blackwell, former Secretary of State of Ohio, former Ohio gubernatorial candidate
* Keith Butler, minister, former Detroit councilman, former candidate for U.S. Senate from Michigan
* Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, senior fellow at the Alexis de Tocqueville Institution
* Rod Paige, former Secretary of Education
* Colin Powell, former United States Secretary of State
* Michael Powell, former FCC chairman
* Condoleezza Rice, United States Secretary of State, former National Security Advisor
* Winsome Sears, former member of Virginia House of Delegates, former candidate for U.S. House
* Michael S. Steele, former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, former candidate for U.S. Senate from Maryland
* Thomas Stith, town councilman of Durham, NC, former candidate for Lt. Gov. of NC
* J.C. Watts, former U.S. Representative from Oklahoma
* Wallace Jefferson, chief justice of the Texas Supreme Court
* Janice Rogers Brown, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
* Clarence Thomas, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, former Equal Employment Opportunity Commission chairman
* Larry Elder, author of 10 Things You Can't Say in America, radio show host
* Alan Keyes, radio host, U.N. Ambassador, presidential candidate, author
* Angela McGlowan, Republican political analyst for Fox News Network who has been nicknamed the "Black Ann Coulter"
* Jesse Lee Peterson, president of The Brotherhood Organization, television and radio host
* Armstrong Williams, author of Beyond Blame, TV host of On Point
* Erik Rush, columnist, author
* La Shawn Barber, columnist, blogger
* Loo Oates, social commentator, columnist, blogger
* Stephen L. Carter, Christianity Today columnist, author of The Culture of Disbelief
* Ken Hamblin, Denver Post columnist
* Deroy Murdock, National Review columnist
* Star Parker, president of the Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education, columnist, author
* Thomas Sowell, Hoover Institute fellow, economist, author of Basic Economics
* Walter E. Williams, economist, columnist, author of More Liberty Means Less Government
* Sophia A. Nelson, columnist, blogger, commentator, GOP political strategist, Chairman of PoliticalIntersection.com
* Lionel Hampton, musician and bandleader
* Yaphet Kotto, actor
* Karl Malone, basketball player, two-time Olympic gold medalist
* Joseph C. Phillips, actor, commentator
* Lynn Swann, football player, Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidate
* Jimmie Walker, actor, comedian
* Akindele Akinyemi,CEO of One Network and conservative educator
* Calvin Butts, anti-gangsta rap activist
* Herman Cain, President of Godfather's Pizza
* Ward Connerly, University of California regent, activist and businessman
* Ezola Foster, president of Americans for Family Values, author of What's Right For All Americans
* Samuel B. Fuller, 20th century entrepreneur
* Robert A. George, journalist, pundit and blogger.
* Niger Innis, director of Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
* Roy Innis, Hudson Institute fellow, chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality
* T.D Jakes, televangelist
* Don King, boxing promoter
* Michael King, National Advisory Board Member of Project 21, former radio talk show host
* John McWhorter, author of Losing the Race and Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute
* James Meredith, former civil rights activist
* Eric Motley, former State Department official, now vice-president of the Aspen Institute
* Deroy Murdock, Wall Street Journal opinion contributor, Cato Institute Scholar
* Gerald A. Reynolds, president of the Center for New Black Leadership, member of Project 21
* Vernon Robinson, Air Force intelligence officer, business professor
* George Schuyler, journalist, novelist
* Shelby Steele, Hoover Institute fellow, author of The Content of Our Character
* Stanley Crouch, author of In Defence of Taboos
* Lee Walker, president of the New Coalition for Economic and Social Change, Heartland Institute
Oscar J. Dunn first black Lieutenant Governor in Louisiana 1868
P.B.S Pinchback and James J. Harris become the first African-American delegates to the Republican National Convention, held in Chicago
1870 Hiram R. Revels is elected to fill U.S. Senate seat formerly held by Jefferson Davis
Joseph H. Rainey, South Carolina, becomes the first African-American Congressman
Alonzo J. Ransier is elected Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina before being elected to the U.S. Congress in '72
1871 Robert B. Elliot chairs South Carolina delegation to the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia
1875 Blanche K. Bruce of Mississippi becomes the first African-American elected to a full term in US Senate
Booker T. Washington
J. Ernest Wilkins as Assistant Secretary of
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