MangoRoX87 asked in PetsHorses · 1 decade ago

Horse trailer issues?

So my gelding recently got over EPM, if you don't know what it is then you should probably find out cuz it sucks!!

ANYWAYS lol his balance is still rather wacked up and I haven't been able to take him away from my house since I got him over a year ago, WHICH SUCKS. I have been working with him and I plan on working with him more as soon as the weather clears up. I have an old straight load stock combo steel trailer and it deffinatly isn't the smoothest ride, and he is probably scared that he is going to fall over (first time he rode in our trailer was veryt traumatic for him saddly and he was screaming and bucking in place, poor baby). I don't so much need tips on how to get him in, cuz he will now, just not stay in, and I have 2 trainers to go to so yeah. What I would MUCH RATHER know is what kind of trailer is best for a horse with balance issues? I have allways perfered a straight load over a slant since it is much more natural for a horse to brace with its front and back legs instead of one side of their body like they would in a slant, just my opinion:P but I wouldn't mind having one. I'm thinking about buying a two horse, but I KNOW he would not get into that. Also my truck can pull bumper pull and gooseneck trailers.

Update:

Okay a loose horse in a trailer is a big no no for me. He would kill himself lol and I have tried feeding him in it and he choked twice, and it really didn't help him at all.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    I had a horse with EPM with the same balance problems.

    I used an open stock trailer for him. I tied him half way back (4 horse trailer), and he'd turn around and put his butt in the curved front area. He'd then brace himself between his tie and the front, and feel more secure. At first I was tying him in the front, but when he'd turn he'd get himself stuck in the nose and get really anxious, so I started tying him further back.

    If you have a two horse stock, I'd recommend turning him so he's riding facing the back. My horse seemed to do so much better that way.

    I absolutely would not get any trailer with open partitions below. I was trailering this same horse with another horse that had a seizure of some sort in the trailer, falling down and thrashing. His legs and my horse's legs were a tangle. This is not good. Also, he had trouble getting back up, as he was partway under the partition, trying to stand up under it. Not good. It was amazing there were no serious injuries (though the seizing horse was ultimately put down because of his neurological issues, unfortunately).

    Make his ride smoother by driving slower, braking slower, and turning slower. Plan your trips for when traffic is light and plan the straightest, smoothest route. When I trailer sick/hurt horses, I don't care if traffic backs up behind me - they can go around! I go slow and easy and as smoothly as possible.

    Edit: In my experience, horses who are afraid they'll have trouble getting up do not lay down - though they may fall down! Don't leave him loose. He needs the tie to balance himself, and if he's walking around in the trailer while it's moving, he may be caught in a bad position when you brake or turn.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    the other people nailed it with an open stock trailer. studies have been done on the best way to trailer horses and they found that the best way to trailer a horse is actually backwards, with his butt towards the front of the trailer. the study also found that if horses had a choice, they would turn their butts towards the front of the trailer. horses put 2/3 of their weight on their front end so it is much easier for them to brace themselves if put in a trailer backwards. when put in forwards like most people put them, if you stop suddenly they'll go stumbling forward because all their weight is in the front. if you load them backwards, they just sway a little or may take one step back. pretty much the only reason people trailer horses with their heads to the front is because it's more convenient for us. that's it. they do make slant load a straight load trailers designed to have the horses backwards, but they are very rare and like 10x more expensive so no one buys them.

    so just tie him about halfway in an open stock trailer and he will position himself (with his butt towards the truck) in a way that's best for him.

    hope this helps.

    Source(s): i'm an equine science major at Colorado State University and we learned this in one of our classes.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Why in the world would you even want to haul a horse who has poor balance. Do you ride a wobbly horse?? I hope not, maybe you should spend some time working him a little to improve his muscle tone and maybe improve his balance.

    If it is something he will never get over you should think of letting him go, I would not think he would not be happy if he is not well.

    Maybe he is a wall crawler. I don't think they will get over it, my sis had one and she was a great show horse but when she was in the trailer, just turning on the motor would make her crawl.

    Source(s): Had a wall crawler, they put their ribs against one wall and all four legs the other way and scram ble.
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  • 1 decade ago

    personally i would go with a slant load ... the horses are much more willing to load when the space looks larger... also try maybe putting another horse in the trailer to show him that its ok... or you could always leave your trailer hooked up to the truck in the pasture and feed him in it so he will get used to it...

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  • 1 decade ago

    try and open stock trailer, you can tie him up, but you can also let him be loose and find his own way to brace himself, and can also lay down if he wishes (as long as he is loose!)

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