Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentEmbassies & Consulates · 1 decade ago

Does the UK require a BTA for a British citizen to travel to the US?

Does the British government require a British citizen with a valid passport and a visa issued by the US Embassy in London to post a Basic Travel Allowance to travel to the United States?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    NO - the BTA is the hallmark of Nigerian and Russian internet scammers

    http://www.country-couples.co.uk/datingtips/basic-...

    The person you are talking to is not a British citizen and is not in the UK. If you do an IP lookup of ther emails you are receiving, you'll see that these emails almost always coming from West Africa or Eastern Europe, not the UK. This scam is so common that the US Embassy in London even has two separate pages on their website warning about it

    http://www.usembassy.org.uk/americanservices/?p=69...

    "There is no such thing as a BTA fee in the United Kingdom. This is a scam and one that we hear about every day at the Embassy. If your friend is someone you’ve met only over the Internet, we recommend that you cease communications with this individual immediately in order to lessen the risk of being exploited. If you have shared any personal information, you may want to contact the police and your financial institutions to protect your identity. Do NOT give this person any money."

    http://www.usembassy.org.uk/cons_new/acs/scs/inter...

    "Beware of anyone who requests funds for a BTA, or Basic Travel Allowance, as a requirement to depart another country for the United States. There is no such thing as a BTA. In other cases, your Internet friend will claim to need a travel allowance, or travel money, to be able to travel to the United States. Again, there is no such requirement under U.S. law."

    I have been flying between the UK and US for more than 25 years, up to 6 times a year, and there is not and has never been any such requirement. UK citizens don't even need a visa to visit the US - so anyone saying they have a visa issued by the US Embassy is scamming you. UK citizens are on the visa waiver so there is no visa for a tourist from the UK - unless they have a criminal background. All you need is a plane ticket, nothing else. You could travel with £1 and nobody would know or care as there is no such requirement as a BTA

    As the embassy suggests, cut off all communication with this person and inform your local police if you have provided any personal informationl. You should also forward copies of all correspondence to the Internet Crime Complaints Center, which is affiliated with the FBI so they can try and put a stop to this scam http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx as well as report them to their ISP and the site where you met so their profile can be shut down to prevent them from scamming others.

  • 1 decade ago

    Kittysue is absolutely right. The British government does not and never has had any requirements on someone LEAVING the UK. As a British citizen I know my government doesn't care about where I travel to - they've issued me with a passport and that's that. The only requirements ever placed on me when I leave the UK are whatever the country I'm going to requires.

    Having been to the USA a few times I also know this: to visit for up to 90 days, I don't need a visa (unless I have been arrested for or convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude, I am a drug abuser, have a serious communicable disease, was involved in Nazi persecutions, espionage or terrorism, or have a physical or mental disorder - which I don't but they still ask all of that every time!)

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    A BTA is something that all and sundry started interior the African international locations some years to instruct to the authorities which you had money while you purchased everywhere you have been going. It became executed away with some years in the past. It seems such as you're coping with an African scammer.

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