Basic VFR weather minimums?

Basic VFR minimums are 1000-3 (1000 ft ceiling and 3 miles visibility), but there are also the basic cloud clearance requirements: 500 feet below, 1000 above, and 2000 horizontal. My question is, how can you have a 1000 foot ceiling and be legal to fly IFR if you must stay 500 feet below the clouds. That would put you flying at 500 feet, which is neither safe or legal (in most places).

Update:

Sorry about that, I did mean VFR the second time.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Assuming you meant VFR there the second time; you're right. To be legal in the pattern you really need a 1500 foot ceiling.

    Remember there is always Special VFR and what's "legal" isn't always smart.

  • lehner
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Vfr Weather Minimums

  • 4 years ago

    Vfr Minimums

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Basic VFR weather minimums?

    Basic VFR minimums are 1000-3 (1000 ft ceiling and 3 miles visibility), but there are also the basic cloud clearance requirements: 500 feet below, 1000 above, and 2000 horizontal. My question is, how can you have a 1000 foot ceiling and be legal to fly IFR if you must stay 500 feet below the...

    Source(s): basic vfr weather minimums: https://shortly.im/UQqqb
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  • 1 decade ago

    You're right, that isn't smart generally. However, imagine a situation where there is a layer over the airport causing the weather reporting to call the ceiling 1000'. If you go a mile or so, that layer isn't there, and you can climb unrestricted. In this case, it would be legal and safe to take off, climb in the direction of the clear skies, and go on your way.

    Of course, while a pilot wouldn't be violating the weather regulations by buzzing around at 500', he would almost certainly be operating in a careless or reckless manner, violating 91.13, and also probably violating the 500' minimum distance from people, structures, property, etc. throughout much of the flight.

    The weather regulation is not meant to be the only limiting law in regards to whether you can or can not fly that day.

    Source(s): CFI
  • 1 decade ago

    What class airspace you are in dictates the separation criteria.

    In class B, you only have to remain clear of clouds

    class G, below 1200' agl. clear of clouds

    Class E: at or above 10,000 feet MSL... 1,000 feet below.1,000 feet above. 1 statute miile horizontal.

    What is legal does not make it safe!

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