Dan Simmons' Ilium complete summary?

I was trying to find a detailed summary of Ilium. it's been awhile since i read it and i just want a couple of reminders before i start Olympos. I have tried google but couldn't find anything that was detailed enough.

thanks

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Normally, I check out a book's Wikipedia entry for this sort of thing, but the entry for 'Ilium' is pretty sparse.

    There is an 'Ilium'/'Olympos' wiki here, with a full synopsis of all of the storylines in the books:

    http://ilium.pbworks.com/

    http://ilium.pbworks.com/#IliumMajorStoryLines

    (Be warned, there are also spoilers for 'Olympos' there, so be careful which entries you read.)

    Enjoy! Dan Simmons is an excellent writer.

  • gery
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Ilium Dan Simmons

  • 4 years ago

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    RE:

    Dan Simmons' Ilium complete summary?

    I was trying to find a detailed summary of Ilium. it's been awhile since i read it and i just want a couple of reminders before i start Olympos. I have tried google but couldn't find anything that was detailed enough.

    thanks

    Source(s): dan simmons 39 ilium complete summary: https://biturl.im/N0ial
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ilium/Olympos is a science fiction duology by Dan Simmons. These events are set in motion by beings who have taken on the roles of the Greek gods. Like Simmons' earlier series, the Hyperion Cantos, it is a form of "literary science fiction" which relies heavily on intertextuality.

    Ilium centers on three character groups: that of Hockenberry (a resurrected twentieth-century Homeric scholar whose duty is to compare the events of the Iliad to the reenacted events of the Trojan War), Greek and Trojan warriors, and Greek gods from the Iliad; Daeman, Harman, Ada, and other humans of an Earth thousands of years after the twentieth century; and the "moravec" robots (named for scientist and futurist Hans Moravec) Mahnmut the Europan and Orphu of Io, also thousands of years in the future, but originating in the Jovian system. The novel is written in first-person, present-tense when centered on Hockenberry's character, but features third-person, past-tense narrative in all other instances. Much like Simmons's Hyperion, where the actual events serve as a frame, the three groups of characters' stories are told over the course of the novel and begin to converge as the climax nears.

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