Rocio asked in EnvironmentGreen Living · 1 decade ago

How much do solar energy panels cost?

My husband is interested in buying solar panels for the roof and i dont know where to find them.

18 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Buying solar panels can be very expensive, especially for installation.

    If your average daily usage is 6.6 kilowatt per hour, then you would need a 2 kilowatt system that could generate ten kilowatts per hour in a day. This system could cost between $10,000 to $20,000. Of course, the higher wattage, the higher the cost.

    There are some alternatives to spending thousands of dollars on solar panels.

    1) Buy several solar panel kits and link them together yourself.

    2) Combine solar with wind power to decrease the number of panels you will need.

    3) Build your own solar panels for around $200 each.

    If you are handy with some basic soldering, then you can make your own solar panels.

    Source(s): Here is site with a video guide with detailed instructions... http://www.howtobuild-solarpanels.com/
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I co own Sunpower Solutions. We are a solar company in South Jersey. I can tell you that the average cost for a system under 7Kw, is $7.95 per watt. What people fail to realize, is that there is a lot more that goes into a PV system than just panels. Racking, hardware, combiner box, inverters, labor to put the panels up, pay the electrician that ties it all together, the architect that measures the wind load on the panels, etc. It's not cheap. Although, in the state of NJ, the the amount of time it takes for the system paying for itself, is 4 years. It doesn't matter if it's a huge system or the smallest PV system, it's 4 years. Any questions, just ask.

    @Martin:

    The thing with those programs, is that the company that is leasing the system, is taking advantage of the renewable energy credit that the system is producing. Yes you get cheap electricity, but you are not taking advantage of the money making ability of the renewable energy credits.

    Source(s): www.sunpowernation.com
  • 1 decade ago

    The cost of a solar system varies as to its size. The larger the system, the cheaper the price.

    You will need a few more items to round out the system. They are ( for a grid tied system):

    1. An approved racking system ( Solar Mount is one of many)

    2. MC cables ( they help interconnect all the panels together.)

    3. Grounding wire, lugs, and ties

    4. An inverter ( size matched to the solar array)

    5. A/C and D/C disconnect switches.

    6. Solar panels and clamps

    There are a few reputable solar distributors that do sell to the general public.I strongly urge you to buy a kit. Once the distributor knows the size of your system, and where you will be installing it, they will put together a complete kit that comes with the correct quantity of size matched components. The cost of DIY grid tied systems ranges between 3,50 and 4.50 a watt.

    Example: If your electric bill is around 100.00 a month, you would need about a 4.5 kW system to handle 100% of your energy needs . if you multiply 4.5k X 4.00 a watt, you would get a system cost of 18,000.00 ( plus tax). To this amount you would apply your state and federal rebates and credits which would probably reduce your net cost to 9,000.00. If you continue to use electricity at the 100.00 per month rate you would break even in 7.5 yrs. Giving the 25 to 30 yr life span of the system, and factor in inflation, your savings would be well into the tens of thousand dollars. If your energy bill is even higher, the return of investment accelerates considerably.

    www.solarelectricsupply.com is a fine site that sells to the public. They have been around quite a while.

    If your interested in guidance with your solar project, check out www.energyeducationalproducts.com thier site will launch in late feb. They do an excellent job of explaining DIY grid tied solar projects.

    Warning stay away from DIY solar panels. Check out my blog www.solarmandan.com and read the " to build or not to build" article.

    Hope this helps. Dan

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    There is a step-by-step video guide online right now that can show you how to reduce your power bill by making your own solar panels.

    Take a look at it: http://tinyurl.com/Earth4EnergyRew

    Why pay thousands of dollars for solar energy ($27,000 average cost) when you can build your own solar panel system for just a fraction of the retail cost. You can build a single solar panel or you can build an entire array of panels to power your whole house.

    Some people are saving 50% on their power bill, some people are reducing their bill to nothing. But what’s most impressive is that just by following these instructions some are even making the power company pay them!

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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    The price of solar systems have dropped dramatically in the last 5 years. I would say it has reached to the point that it financially makes sense to go solar! An average home in [California] with $200 monthly electric bill would need a 7.25 kW system to offset 100% of their electric bill (means you won't have to pay anything to your utility company).

    Average price of the panels are anything between $2,500-3,500 per kW (after 30% Federal Tax credit which might expire at the end of 2016). So, average system price will be $17,000-$25,000.

    If you wanna buy the system your loans monthly payments will be around $140-150 for 12 years and after that your system is paid off and you can enjoy free electricity! Total saving over 25 years can exceed $70,000.

    Regarding the selection of the right panels or the best company in your area, it varies case by case, city by city. Pick My Solar offers a free service to homeowners to choose the right fit for their home. It's like Expedia or Priceline for residential solar market.

    Source(s): www.PickMySolar.com
  • 1 decade ago

    For some areas in the US you can actually get solar panels installed for $0 down!

    A company called SolarCity offers a program where you simply lease the solar panels and pay for them as you go, this is a neat idea because you can use the money you save on your electricity bill to pay for the solar panels themselves!

    Read more about leasing solar panels from SolarCity here;

    http://www.solarcity.com/campaigns/firstsolar/firs...

  • 1 decade ago

    It's not a do-it-yourself project for most people. The usual thing is to look under "solar" in your phone book for a professional installer. If there aren't any nearby, it may not make financial sense in your area. There is no typical size of system, but within a factor of 2, an installed system tends to cost about $20,000, from which you get a 30% federal tax credit, and possibly other state and local incentives.

    For some sample panel prices, you can go to sunelec.com, or just google "solar panel prices".

    Here is our family page if you want to see what our install looked like: http://www.angelfire.com/ca2/roderick/solar/photov...

  • 1 decade ago

    In general you are looking at about $5 to $6 per Watt installed.

    Most people will break even in about 7 to 20 years except for people who get their electricity very cheap (hence the hydro comment above).

    You do NOT need batteries if you are in a state which allows net metering. you would only need the solar panels and a grid tied inverter and you can use the city grid as your battery bank. This type of setup is much more economical.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Solar electricity systems can save you more money. Want to know more features about Solar Panels Companies? Contact us today for more details.

  • 5 years ago

    If you want a general ballpark figure, it's around $20K. That said, you can get started for free since so many of them offer a no money down financing option. It's a big upfront cost with the idea that you'll get paid for it on the back end--or at least be more environmentally conscious about your energy usage and production. There's a million options out there. Find a local one and have a conversation about them about your options. Here's one that's local to me http://santacruzsolarcompanies.com/ if you need some basic info. Their site is fairly informative about intro questions like this. Hope this helps.

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