promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationHunting · 1 decade ago

Has there ever been experimentation with GOLD bullets?

Now I know this wouldn’t be the least bit cost effective. Wouldn’t make any sense cost wise, but they’re always them people that got more money than they know what to do with…

I was watching a movie the other day that mentioned SILVER bullets, and this got me thinking, what about GOLD for bullets? Lead is used for two main reasons: malleability(for fragmentation) and weight(for maintaining momentum for deeper penetration). GOLD is also very malleable and is almost as heavy as lead. It is also said(by GAMO USA for their Raptor GOLD plated air rifle pellets) to have a lubricating effect(helping it slide through the barrel easier), and also is noncorrosive unlike lead.

Does anybody know of any documented experimentation with SOLID GOLD bullets???

This is nothing serious, and trust me I would never try it even if I had too much money... Just curious!

11 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    I do not shoot gold bullets although I have some I cast and loaded for conversation pieces. I have a place near me with a placer deposit that I get a far amount of gold from each year. But there is no way in hell with gold over $1000 an ounce that I will shoot gold bullets anymore!

    I have tried it in my indoor handgun range but made damn sure to recover them. Talk about expansion! Soft gold expands like mad on impact. In a super high velocity round it can come apart in the air and disintegrate on impact with a semihard surface.

    EDIT;

    I gave a hurried answer so let me explain better.

    My buddy and I were running a sluice box and talking when we joked about making some gold bullets. So the next day at my place we melted down some gold nuggets and some gold dust (not pure) and poured them into a Layman .430 wadcutter mold and weighed them. I don’t recall the exact weight it was 15 years ago but it did weigh over the 240gr that a cast lead bullet would weigh. But not THAT much difference. So we reduced the powder charge to compensate for the added weight in the .44 special casing. This was a light cowboy action load and we shot it at a bucket of sand. The bullet had deformed some but nothing radically so. We then loaded up a .44 magnum casing with a light load and shot the sand bucket and it expanded big time. So my buddy tries loading a 30-30 and it worked and expanded big time! He then tries to use a gold cast bullet in a .243 with a stout charge (at his place) and he said the bullet fragmented before it hit the target. The paper target had a bunch of tiny holes in it.

    None of what we did was remotely scientific. We never used pure gold. We didn’t keep records or try it more than a few rounds; it was just for the hell of it.

    Pure lead can come apart at super high velocities this is why they add tin to make lead harder and even so limit the velocity and use a gas check to prevent lead building up in the barrel. This is why high velocity ammo has a copper jacket to keep the lead inside intact and to control expansion. We never used any protective jacket on the gold bullets.

    We ended up loading a few rounds for conversation pieces and still have them today.

    Would we do it again? No! The price of gold 15 years ago was far less than today. It was a pain getting the gold out of the rifling and retrieving it. Shooting bullets that are worth several hundred dollars don’t jive with my pocket book and sure as hell doesn’t sit well with all the hard work we put into getting it!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    Gold Bullet

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    In the old west gold was frequently loaded into shot gun shells by unscruplious sellers of old payed out gold mines. They will shoot a few shells of gold into the mine walls. When the prospective buyers starts to look at the walls they see all this gold that appears to be coming from the dirt. After a few days they realize the mine is just dirt and the seller has a three day head start with their money.

    Gold bullets have been made for many kings and heads of state over the past 100 years. Usually when given a presentation grade firearm in a nice box. They are normally never poured like a regular bullet, but, are tooled out on a lathe and then highly polished - much like the early Nosler bullets in the 1950's and 1960's.

    Hope this helps

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Sam Z
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    Actually gold is denser than lead so it would be heavier than lead if cast into an identical shape.

    It is also much more malleable than lead and melts at a lower tempurature which means it would deform much easier and couldn't be used in high velocity applications unless a much harder copper jacket covered it just like most lead core rounds.

    However if price wasn't an issue I could easily see it being used in making bullets for extended range applications. A copper jacketed gold core bullet would have a much higher ballistic coefficient than a lead core round of the same design. You would end up with a smaller bullet that maintains a better downrange energy and velocity as well as being less affected by wind.

    Source(s): Amature gunsmith / Avid hunter
    • tadchem4 years agoReport

      Lead melts at 327 °C; gold melts at 1062 °C.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    The effect would probably identical to shooting solid lead bullets. I'd expect average penetration and stopping ability - worse the standard FMJ rounds. The corrosive effects of lead is nothing compared to the corrosive effects of gas and residue produced by gunpowder, so I would imagine that the "lubricating effect" of gold would be virtually unnoticeable. Also, gold is slightly lighter than lead so there would be no weight advantage either.

    On a side note... There is a huge armor-piercing advantage in making bullets out of depleted Uranium, though. But last time I checked the only gun that used those was the 30mm cannon in A-10 Thunderbolt. Hoorah Air Force!

    --------------

    To anyone questioning the weight of gold vs. the weight of lead - check the periodic table. Here, I'll make it easier: www.ptable.com

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Only in an Indian movie where they molded gold into ball shot for their muzzle loaders and showed them doing it. And the battle where the warrior ties himself to a stake for his final battle {so he wouldn't run] it was a death sentence and a sign of bravery. It may have Michael Ansara,can't remember the movie,they showed the gold worked. Hell man I would try in my dreams.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No... totally unnecessary. You can kill most anything living with a lead bullet, but a few undead creatures may require silver bullets.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    At over $1100 an ounce I don't think your going to see to many experimenters.....

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Goldfinger used gold bullets but then he was a billionaire.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    "OLD is also very malleable and is almost as heavy as lead. "

    you mean heavier than lead. that's the way it is on the table of elements.

    and no, I know nothing. it would be a waste of money and I assure you, no one these days are that rich.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.