What is the definition of language style?

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  • Rain
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Language Style

    academese

    language typical of academies or the world of learning; pedantic language.

    aeolism

    a tendency to longwindedness. — aeolistic, adj.

    anecdotalism

    1. the writing or telling of short narratives concerning an interesting, amusing, or curious incident or event.

    2. an excessive use of anecdotes, as sometimes in the conversation of the aged. — anecdotalist, n.

    archaism

    the deliberate use, for effect, of old-fashioned terminology in literature.

    Asiaticism

    a manner of speech, writing, or architecture distinguished by excessive ornamentation or floridity. — Asiatical, adj.

    barbarism

    the use of terms or constructions feit by some to be undesirably foreign to the established customs of the language. — barbarian, n., adj.

    battology

    futile repetition in speech or writing.

    bureaucratese

    language characteristic of government bureaucracy, characterized by excessive use of jargon, convoluted construction, and periphrasis.

    businessese

    language typical of that used by business people or the world of business, characterized by use of jargon and abbreviation.

    causticism, causticity

    a sharp, tart wittiness. Also causticness. — caustic, adj.

    cinemese

    language typical of the cinema, as that used in film dialogue or in film criticism.

    collegese

    language typical of that used by college students, characterized by use of slang and neologisms.

    computerese

    language used by those in the business of manufacturing, selling, servicing, or using electronic computers, characterized by many abbreviations and acronyms, excessive use of technical jargon, and, frequently, lack of concern for traditional spelling and grammar.

    concettism

    1. any writing characterized by conceits, i.e., elaborate and fanciful figures of speech, as in the opening lines of T.S. Eliot’s “Prufrock.”

    2. the use of conceits in writing.

    economese

    language and jargon typical of economists and the field of economics.

    epigrammatism

    1. the composition of brief witty, ingenious, or sententious statements.

    2. the composition of short, concise poems, often satirical, displaying a witty or ingenious thought. — epigrammatist, n. — epigrammatic, adj.

    federalese

    language typical of the federal government, especially bureau-cratie jargon.

    fustian

    a high-flown, bombastic style of writing or speaking. — fustianist, n.

    journalese

    language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.

    laconicism, laconism

    a tendency to use few words to express a great deal; conciseness. — laconic, adj.

    legalese

    language typical of lawyers, laws, legal forms, etc., characterized by archaic usage, prolixity, and extreme thoroughness.

    lexiphanicism

    Archaic. 1. the use of excessively learned and bombastic terminology.

    2. an instance of this language style. — lexiphanic, adj.

    literaryism

    1. the habitual use of literary forms.

    2. an expression belonging to a literary language.

    lucidity

    the quality, state, or art of clarity in thought and style. — lucidness, n. — lucid, adj.

    macaronicism

    a style of language in which Latin forms and words are mixed with vernacular words, as skato, slippere, falli, bumptum. — macaronic, n., adj.

    macrology

    an excessive wordiness.

    newspaperese

    journalese.

    officialese

    language characteristic of officialdom, typified by polysyllabism and much periphrasis.

    paragraphism

    the system of writing paragraphs in newspaper-journalism style. — paragraphist, n. — paragraphically, adv.

    parrhesia

    a tendency to boldness and frankness of speech; freedom of expression, as in much modern literature.

    pedagese

    the language of pedagogues or language typical of pedagogues, characterized by pedanticism. Also called academese.

    pedestrianism

    the use of a style lacking in vitality, imagination, or distinction; prosiness. — pedestrian, adj.

    pellucidity

    the quality, state, or art of writing or speaking in a fashion that is easy to understand. — pellucidness, n. — pellucid, adj.

    Pentagonese

    language typical of the Pentagon or the U.S. defense establishment, characterized by use of acronyms, neologisms and the use of nouns as verbs and adjectives.

    postclassicism

    a written or spoken expression characteristic of the period following the classical period of a language. — postclassical, adj.

    sardonicism

    a style of speaking or writing characterized by bitter, contemptuous, or scornful derision.

    sensationalism

    yellow journalism.

    societyese

    language typical of high society, characterized by affectation.

    sociologese

    language or jargon typical of sociology or sociologists.

    stagese

    language typical of the stage and stage people, characterized by affectation, hyperbole, and melodramatic effects.

    stichometry

    the practice of expressing the successive ideas in a prose composition in single lines corresponding to natural cadences or sense divisions. — stichometric, stichometrical, adj.

    telegraphese

    the brief, sometimes cryptic langua

    Source(s): www.thefreedictionary.com/Language+Style
  • Leanne
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    You should explain that you'd like to go back to your natural hair, and ask her how to do that. Good luck!

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    I also have the same question

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