What are some good science fiction/fantasy book recommendations?

I REALLY enjoyed the Pendragon series and was wondering what other books like it are good. I have also read Twilight and The Host. I'm 19 and looking for books more for my age. I'm into science fiction/fantasy books with action and romance. Any recommendations are appreciated.

Just no vampire books please.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Finally! Someone who asks for books in my genre instead of romance books (don't get me wrong, I like romance just as the whole focus of the book)

    Anyways try...

    The Books of Pellinor by Alison Croggon (first is called The Naming--my favorite series)

    The Inheritence Cycle by Christopher Paolini (first is Eragon)

    The Rune Blade Trilogy by Ann Marston

    Any Shannara book by Terry Brooks

    The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien

    Lord of the rings by JRR Tlkien

    Harry Potter by JK Rowling

    His Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman (first is the Golden Compass)

    The Gemma Doyle Trilogy by Libba Bray

    The Green Rider series by Kristen Britain (first is just called Green Rider)

    Dragon Haven by Robin McKinley

    The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley (pretty much any of hers)

    The only Sci-fi I've really read besides the Host is Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, but it was really good!

    I've got more fantasy, too, if you need them...those are just a few...

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  • Carol
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Some writers I've enjoyed: Sheri S Tepper Neil Gaiman Neal Stephenson William Gibson Bruce Sterling Connie Willis Orson Scott Card Charles DeLint Terry Pratchett Douglas Adams Christopher Moore Naomi Novik

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  • 1 decade ago

    Pendragon is amazing. I have yet to read the most recent one, though.

    Some other good books are Eragon, A Clockwork Orange, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Harry Potter!

    Those are only a few.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Dragons of Autumn Twilight

    Dragons of Winter Night

    Dragons of Spring Dawning

    by: Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman

    good action/adventure, light romance, and engaging humor make for a pleasant trilogy to read

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Oh my gosh, Pendragon's an awesome series, huh? Love it!

    Well, erm, anyway, I really like the Inheritance cycle by Christopher Paolini, if you haven't read that yet. Very good book.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I just posted reviews of the books I read in 2009, and what I'm excited to read in 2010. Strictly non-vampire. :) Hopefully this will give you some ideas.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Perhaps the artemis fowl series?

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  • 1 decade ago

    In FANTASY here are some I (Fittings Doc) would recommend:

    "Sheepfarmer's Daughter" by Elizabeth Moon

    (first book of the “Deed of Paksenarrion” trilogy)

    It has a FEMALE main character.

    "The Riddle-Master of Hed" (1976) by Patricia A. McKillip

    (first book of "The Riddle-Master trilogy")

    "The First Book of Swords" (1983) by Fred Saberhagen

    (first book of the "Books of the Swords" series)

    "The Sword of Shannara" (1977) by Terry Brooks

    (first book in the Original "Shannara Trilogy")

    "A Spell for Chameleon" (1977) by Piers Anthony

    (the first book of the "Xanth" series)

    "The Dark Tide" (1984) by Dennis L. McKiernan

    (first book of the "Mithgar" series)

    “The Crystal Shard" (1988) by R.A. Salvatore.

    (the first book of "The Icewind Dale Trilogy")

    "Pawn of Prophecy" (1982) by David Eddings

    (first book of the "Belgariad" series)

    "Legend” (1984) by David Gemmell (The MASTER of Heroic fantasy)

    (first book of the “Drenai Saga”)

    "An Oblique Approach" (1998) by Eric Flint & David Drake

    (first book of the "Belisarius" series)

    "The Misplaced Legion" (1987) by Harry Turtledove

    (first book of the "Videssos" series)

    One of Julius Caesar's legions is transported to a world with magic.

    "Magician" (1982) by Raymond E. Feist

    (first book in "The Riftwar Saga")

    In SCIENCE FICTION, here are some I would recommend:

    “On Basilisk Station” (1993) by David Weber

    (the first book in the "Honor Harrington" series)

    This Space Navy series has FEMALE lead character. Beyond the Technology of the spacecraft and weapons, the story revolves around interpersonal relationships with which you will be able to identify.

    Sassinak (1990) by Anne McCaffrey

    (the first book of “The Planet Pirates trilogy”)

    Has a FEMALE lead character.

    "Hunting Party" (1993) by Elizabeth Moon

    (first book of the "Heris Serrano” trilogy - a Space Opera)

    It has a FEMALE main character.

    “Once a Hero“ (1997) by Elizabeth Moon

    (first book of the “Esmay Suiza” trilogy)

    Another Space Navy series with a FEMALE main character.

    Beyond the Technology of the spacecraft and weapons, the story revolves around a personal struggle for identify with which you will be able to identify.

    “Rissa Kerguelen” (aka “Young Rissa”) (1976) by F. M. Busby

    (the fist book of the “Rissa Kerguelen and Bran Tregare” series)

    Has a FEMALE lead character.

    "The Planet Savers" (1958) by Marion Zimmer Bradley

    (the first book of the "Darkover" series)

    “For Love of Mother-Not” (1983) Alan Dean Foster

    (the first book in the “Humanx” series - featuring Pip and Flinx)

    "Weyr Search" (1967) by Anne McCaffrey

    (the first book in the "Dragonriders of Pern" series)

    "The Ship Who Sang” (1969) by Anne McCaffrey

    (the first book of “The Brain & Brawn Ship” series)

    “1632” (2000) by Eric Flint

    (first book of the “Ring of Fire” alternate history series)

    "Ender's Game" (1985) by Orson Scott Card

    "Speaker for the Dead" (1986 - the sequel to "Ender's Game") by Orson Scott Card

    (Both won the Hugo and Nebula Awards.)

    "Island in the Sea of Time" (1998) by S.M. Stirling.

    (the first book of the "Nantucket" series)

    "Foundation" (1951) by Issac Asimov

    (the first book of the "Foundation Series")

    Postulates the societal change, which would accompany the expansion into the stars.

    The seiries won the one-time Hugo Award for "Best All-Time Series" in 1966.

    (One of the other books in the series also won a Hugo Award.)

    “Dune” (1965) by Frank Herbert

    (the first book of the “Dune Series)

    (Won the Hugo and Nebula Awards.)

    “I, Robot” (1950) the book of early short stories by Issac Asimov on the subject of ROBOTS in which he postulates the "Three Laws of Robotics" should be read as a basis before reading the

    "The Caves of Steel" (1954) by Issac Asimov

    (the first of the "Robot" series / Lije Bailey mysteries)

    These books are the source from which the movie "I, Robot" is drawn.

    "Warriors Apprentice" (1986) by Lois McMaster Bujold

    (the first book of "The Vorkosigan Saga")

    After being genetically "damaged" by a bio weapon in his mother's womb, Miles Vorkosigan overcomes prejudice to claim his birthright.

    "Cross Time Engineer" series - (aka the "Conrad Stargard" series)

    by Leo Frankowski

    which begins with "The Cross Time Engineer" (1993)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Frankow…

    Its even better if you are POLISH as the main character is as well!

    This was an eye opening look at how technology could transform a society, and gave some very good descriptions of simple improvements that lead to our own industrial revolution.

    I guess you can tell I loved these books.

    In HUMOROUS Sci-Fi here are some I would recommend:

    "Another Fine Myth" (1978) by Robert Lynn Asprin

    (the first book of the "Myth Adventure" Series)

    It revolves around a boy from Klah (hence he is a Klahd) becoming a magician with the help of his mentor a demon (dimensional traveler) from Perv (so he is a Pervect NOT a Pervert).

    Source(s): 40 years a Sci-Fi / Fantasy fan
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