Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsInfectious Diseases · 1 decade ago

Is the H1N1 vaccine safe?

Hi, I'm 16 years old and I am going to get a swine flu shot in a few days. My only concern is if it is safe or not. I have heard multiple rumors about mercury in the vaccine and causing genetic defects. It would really calm me down if someone had a good answer for all of this.

Update:

*response to A.*

Yeah, like I'm really going to fall for a joke like that. Especially someone who can't type complete sentences.

Update 2:

*in response to Matt's answer* By far that is THE BEST answer I have heard. Thank you!

4 Answers

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  • Lisa
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Most doses of the H1N1 (as well as seasonal) flu vaccines contain 25 mcg mercury. That, just in itself, is a reason to not get the vaccine. The flu vaccines contain 50,000 parts per billion mercury. The EPA classifies any liquid containing more than 200 parts per billion mercury as hazardous waste. So the flu vaccine is 250 times over the limit for hazardous waste. If a flu vaccine vial spills on the floor, legally, it must be cleaned up by a HazMat team. But apparently it's okay to be injected with it? I don't think so. http://www.jsonline.com/news/29295284.html

    You can read the package inserts that are included with each shipment of vaccine, which list ingredients, many of the possible side effects, etc. Here are the package inserts: http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines...

    There are 4 brands of injectable vaccines, and 1 brand of nasal spray. The nasal spray doesn't contain mercury, but it does contain MSG (something I try to avoid in food, and something I definitely don't want sprayed up my nose). Also, the nasal spray vaccine makes you potentially contagious for over 21 days, so you are supposed to stay away from immunocompromised people for at least 3 weeks, although I don't think they often tell you that.

    You can also read VAERS reports of vaccine reactions people have had. Here is some information about VAERS http://vaers.hhs.gov/resources/VAERS_Brochure.pdf

    And here are the VAERS reports for the swine flu vaccine:

    Injectable: http://medalerts.org/vaersdb/findfield.php?TABLE=O...

    Nasal spray: http://medalerts.org/vaersdb/findfield.php?TABLE=O...

    Here's a sad story about a teenager who got Guillain Barre Syndrome within hours of the shot: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33845867/ns/health-col... (of course the CDC claims there is no clear link).

    The "Youtube girl" "A" is referring to is Desiree Jennings, who became extremely ill and almost died after receiving a seasonal flu shot in August. She's the one who, due to neurological injury from the flu shot, could only walk backwards or run, but could not walk forward. http://www.myfoxdc.com/dpp/health/101309_woman_dis...

    Since you mentioned your fear of the vaccine affecting genes, your answer is right in the package inserts: "Neither Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Monovalent Vaccine nor FLULAVAL has been evaluated for carcinogenic or mutagenic potential, or for impairment of fertility. " http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccine... (page 9) All the package inserts say the same thing. They don't know if the vaccine can mutate genes, because they have not tested it for that.

    If you have already decided to get the vaccine no matter what information you are given, I'm sorry that I can't help to calm you down. But hopefully you will thoroughly read the sources I have provided, and make an informed decision.

  • 1 decade ago

    The H1N1 vaccine is safe. I have received both it and the seasonal flu vaccine this year as I work in a hospital - neither vaccine produced any side effects.

    The rumors which you have heard are in reference to infant vaccinations. There is speculation that the mercury-based compound called thimerosal is to blame for cases of autism in infants going through the CDC-endorsed vaccination schedule. There have been several large scale studies conducted that showed no increase in autism rates in children following the vaccination schedule; however, people are still skeptical. At 16, there is little if any risk with vaccines, save for an allergy to egg protein.

    Source(s): Internal Medicine Pharmacist
  • lolit
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    yes it is safe although there are side effects which are manageable with the use of symptomatic relievers.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    heh no you shouldnt have

    look up in youtube the girl who got retarded by it

    im gonna praying for you

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