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Can you n-number a 2 axis ultralight?

I was wondering if you "assemble" a 2 axis ultralight like a quicksilver, if you could N-number it with the FAA as a home-built lsa. Or if you could do a 3-axis conversion on a quicksilver and do it. I was just thinking of building a LSA that has STOL capabilities to take off from my field at my house and use to build PIC time.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Far 103 was just made so people could get into flying very inexpensive and so the FAA wouldnt have to govern them. But as the other person said, as long as you do 51% of the work putting it together then yes you can N-number any ultralight. And i dont care what people say, flying a ultralight isnt as simple as people think. Yes they are basic aircraft but they are affected by the elements and are real light so they have no inertia. I have flown ultralights to G5's and learning to fly a ultralight has made me more of a efficient pilot. i have flown with Hi time airline pilots who never flown a ultralight and they have about killed me. I have also instructed people in GA aircraft that are transitioning to GA planes and getting there licenses that were better pilots and could handle the bigger plane with ease. Any time logged will make you a better and more efficient pilot. And those hours will mean something. And if your a High time pilot that thinks Your to good for ultralights but never flown one i invite you down to Lakeland Florida and see how good you really are.

    Source(s): 15 years flying almost everything under the sun.
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  • FanMan
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    There is nothing that says an experimental-amateur built has to be 3 axis, so the answer to your question is yes. However, you can't convert an existing Quicksilver to experimental unless you can convince the inspector that you did more than half of the work building it.

    Why anybody would choose to build a new 2 axis airplane is beyond me, though... and although you could log the hours they won't count for much.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I say no, as an ultralight is not an aircraft, but an ultralight vehicle. Read Part 103 of the FAA regulations. The FAA wants no part of certifying ultralights and would have nothing to say about them, except for the fact they fly.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, you can register it as an LSA-Special. The time you log won't count for much. What do you want to use the logged time for? Most places won't count it for experience if you want a job, and it won't look good to the FAA either.

    Source(s): CFI, A&P/IA
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  • 1 decade ago

    If my knowledge serves me correctly an ultralight of any kind does not require a license in the US however there isn't any law I know of preventing you from getting it licensed.

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  • The 51% rule only applies to your plane's amateur-built status and your eligibility to apply for a Repairman's Certificate.

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