Did the prophecy of the destruction of the port city of Tyre come true?

So, I did my own research because the answers I found didn't have enough info or weren't sufficient or historically sound. This is what I found. The Bible makes this prediction of the city: Ezekiel 26:1-14 has at least six prophesies regarding Tyre that have been fulfilled. These predictions are the... show more So, I did my own research because the answers I found didn't have enough info or weren't sufficient or historically sound. This is what I found. The Bible makes this prediction of the city:
Ezekiel 26:1-14 has at least six prophesies regarding Tyre that have been fulfilled. These predictions are the following:

Nebuchadnezzar would attack Tyre (v. 7-11)
The city would be destroyed (v. 8-12)
The rocks would be scraped into the sea (v. 4)
Many nations would fight against the city (v. 3)
Fisherman would spread their nets on the city (v. 5, 14)
It would never be rebuilt (v. 14)
When Ezekiel prophesied against this city it was the most prosperous port city in the area. If Ezekiel had looked at Tyre in his day and made these predictions in human wisdom, there would had been only the slightest of chances of them all coming true (some estimates are around one in 75,000,000).

The city of Tyre consisted of a mainland metropolis and a small Island that stood about half a mile offshore.

The prophecy mentioned in Ez. 26:14 found its fulfilment regarding mainland Tyre under Nebuchadnezzar. Three years after Ezekiel's Prophecy Nebuchadnezzar moved in and besieged the ancient city of Tyre. He attacked the mainland city and held it besieged for about thirteen years. He then marched into the city to find it nearly deserted. The Tyrians had abandoned the mainland and fortified themselves on the Island of Tyre. The mainland was over-run and defeated, and it was thrown down and left in ruins. The Island continued to be a mighty power in the Mediterranean until many years later.

Insular Tyre recovered partly, after seventy years (Is. 23:17,18), but again suffered under Alexander, then under Antigonus, and finally under the Saracens at the beginning of the fourteenth century A.D.

Alexander the Great besieged the island of Tyre during his war on the Persians. Alexander III after defeating Darius moved on towards Egypt. He called upon the former cities of the Persians to open their gates and let him in, hoping to prevent the cities being used by the Persian fleets. Tyre refused to do so and so Alexander became so angry that one city held out against him that he laid siege to it. But having no fleet of ships and not being able to get to them would have caused him some considerable problems, so he destroyed the remains of mainland Tyre and threw the remains into the sea to build a causeway to the Island. The causeway was 60ft wide and half a mile long and at the end he cast siege engines and towers. Alexander realised he needed ships to take the city and he started mustering a huge fleet from his conquered subjects: Sidon, Aradus, Byblus, Rhodes, Soli, Mallos & Macedon and Cyprus. The massive fleet ensured the destruction of Tyre was just a matter of time.

Though Tyre recovered from this she never rose to that splendid position again. But she still stood.

Antigonius was one of the successors of Alexander the great and a great leader. He won many battles and among them was another siege of Tyre.

Later, During the Crusades in 690 A.D. the city was taken by the Muslims and this caused the Crusaders to fight for it. When the inhabitants heard the Sultan had sent soldiers to capture it they opened their doors to let them in. They believed they were protected by a truce but they beheld their population massacred and the Muslims fury extended even to the stones they destroyed.

LeStrange quotes that the city was in ruins right until then, in 1321 A.D. and even to this day the ruins of Tyre can be seen.

Nothing but a small fishing village remains and the fishermen spread their nets their to dry or to fix. The once great city of Tyre is gone. Old Tyre was never rebuilt after its destruction by Nebuchadnezzar; and there are now no traces left to mark its site. Now its harbours are choked with sand, precluding all hope of future restoration. "Not one entire house is left, and only a few fishermen take shelter in the vaults" (Maundrell). The new city, when visited by Maundrell, Bruce, and other travellers, was literally "a place for fishers to dry their nets on".

Now Tyre "cannot be found" or rather that which was the ancient city is no longer there. Instead, on the island of Tyre you will find a small fishing village that bears the name Súr.

The Prophecies of God fulfilled are these

1. Nebuchadnezzer would attack he attacked three years after Ezekiel's

This was predicted in 590 b.C. Nebuchadnezzar laid siege to Tyre four years after the prophecy was made. After a 13 year siege (586-573 b.C.). The mainland city was destroyed in 573 b.C. as foretold, but the island city of Tyre still remained.

2. The city would be destroyed

It cannot be found today. Old Tyre is gone and we can only find evidence of it by digging down.

3. The rocks would be scraped into the sea

Alexander did this in 333 b.C. against the Island of Tyre. When island Tyre refused to submit to Alexander, he demolished the ol
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