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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 1 decade ago

Projectile Motion in Outer Space HELP!?

A rocket in outer space is thrusting along the x direction with an acceleration of 15 m/s^2 while drifting freely (no applied force) in the y direction. Is this motion similar to projectile motion? Why? Thanks!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Is it a projectile? is it moving? do the laws of motion F= MA apply?

    are the conditions of F, local gravity, air friction the same?

    think

    short answer YES, long answer, forces must be specified.

    some motion is straight line other motion is in a curve

    Source(s): physics
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  • 1 decade ago

    The main difference between projectile motion and a freely accelerating object (as in the context of an object accelerating in space) is that there is no (or very negligible amounts of) gravity acting on the object to deteriorate its continuing motion.

    More simply, in space, the object is free to continue accelerating and travelling in a single direction. On Earth, the object's motion is typically parabolic, and does not continue in a straight line, due to the forces of the Earth's gravity acting on it as it travels.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yes. Objects in projectile motion have one force applied to them only, gravity. This causes a constant acceleration towards the direction of the force. In this example, there is also acceleration, with no other external force being applied since there is no air resistance in space.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No. Projectile motion is a parabola that results from a flying object being affected by gravity (or magnetism).

    With no gravity affecting the rocket's path, it will continue in a straight line indefinitely. However, on a planet or near a planet, gravity will affect a projectile's path and make it look like a parabola.

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  • 4 years ago

    You always divide a vector in horizontal and vertical components , it simply makes it easier. For the given problem the angle needs to be mentioned, so as to determine the vertical component. If the question merely asks for the horizontal speed after 0.8 seconds then it can be determined directly that the answer is the same , that is 20 m per s , as the horizontal component of velocity dont change in a projectile motion

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It will just move in a straight line. I don't know what you mean exactly by projectile motion.

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