why do i have to pay the plumber myself when im insured?

i have a unsolved leak in my bathroom, the plumber is trying to work out where it is coming from, but is unsuccessful so far. i have contacted my insurance company and they will repair any damage, but will not pay for the leak to be fixed, why not?? It is looking like it has been a long standing problem, originating from original installation, we only bought the house 3 years ago and have been unaware of problem, so how could we have repaired it? im confused!

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  • Big Al
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Homeowners insurance will pay for the damage but not to fix the plumbing. That is what your "home warranty" is for. That covers many things that are excluded from your home owners insurance. Most people get a home warranty when they buy a house as part of the closing costs. It runs about $400 a year. Typically, people let these expire after the first year. If you still have yours, give them a call. You will need to use one of their approved service companies for the repair so you will probably have to pay for the work already done by the first plumber out of your own pocket.

    What ever you do, make sure to get references on any plumber that you use and check to make sure that they are licensed, bonded & insured before you ever let them start working. There are plenty of people out there that call themselves plumbers that really aren't!

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  • Cala
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    If you are in the UK then your buildings insurance covers you for what is called consequential loss - that is damage caused as a direct result of an incident. It does not cover you for maintenance issues. If you could prove that the damage to the pipe was as a result of accidental damage then they may pay for the plumbing - if you cannot prove accidental damage then it is a maintenance issue and you are responsible for the maintenance.

    If your roof leaks because it has not been properly maintained then the insurer will pay for internal water damage but not for repair of the leak.

    It doesn't matter that you have been unaware of the problem - that is nothing to do with your insurer, they just pay for the consequential damage. It is still your maintenance issue. If you had been aware of it but had done nothing about it then your insurer would not have covered you for the damage caused. You need to get the leak sorted before you repair the damage. If you don't, then your insurer won't pay out for water damage a second time. If a plumber cannot find the source of the leak then you need to get a specialist company in to source the leak.

    Source(s): Insurance Approved Building Company
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Insurance usually excludes the cost of repairing leaks from pipes, soil pipes etc. as they consider it to be a maintenance problem but covers the damage that they do. They will cover repairs to pipes in the event of storm or impact damage and sometimes freezing if the property is adequately heated and insulated.

    If you are in the UK and the problem was due to poor workmanship or design then contact the National Housebuilders Council ( http://www.nhbc.co.uk/ ) as it may be covered under guarantee.

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  • Dion J
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Insurance is designed to cover accidental damage, not maintenance. The fact that you were unaware isn't relevant.

    If it is an ongoing problem, consider yourself lucky that you are even being paid for the damage- because repeated leakage isn't covered.

    Source(s): Former adjuster
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  • 1 decade ago

    If it is a newly constructed building then the onus of getting your leakage is on the developer and in case he does not revert to ur compalint,then refer to MOFA Act.The developer defects and maintenance liabilities is for the period of 10 years.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Because plumbing is not covered. It specifically states that in your policy- read it.

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