Backing-Up a crashed Hard Drive?

My computer crashed and I did a hard drive diagnostic and it failed. Is there anyway that I can get my files off of the crashed hard drive before I send it to hp to receive a brand new one?

I have a hp pavilion d2910us.

9 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Step 1

    Remove the crashed hard drive from your computer. The exact procedure will vary based on your system, but generally requires only unscrewing a few screws and disconnecting the power and data cables from the crashed drive.

    Step 2

    Install the crashed drive into an external hard drive enclosure. This is fairly simple as well, and the procedure is basically just the reverse of what you did to remove the drive in step 1.

    Step 3

    Plug this crashed external drive into a functional computer. Under Windows, the drive should be automatically recognized as an external hard drive.

    Step 4

    Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the external hard drive. Can you see your files? If so, your files are not totally corrupted and lost, so you will probably be able to get some or all of your documents back with enough effort.

    Step 5

    Now try to browse through your folders, if it is working, can simply copy and paste from your crashed drive to the hard drive on the functional system.

    Step 6

    If the drive is not working, right click on the drive letter in windows explorer, and go to "properties". Go to the tab "Tools" and you should see "Error Checking". Click on "Check Now". Enable "Automatically fix file system errors" and "Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors". Then let it run (it may take a while).

    Step 7

    If the utility runs all the way through, it may *temporarily* fix your drive. Get all of your data off as soon as you can because your hard drive can (and likely will) crash again, leaving it in an even worse condition.

  • 1 decade ago

    Follow these steps to backup your data.

    1.Remove the crashed hard drive from your computer. The exact procedure will vary based on your system, but generally requires only unscrewing a few screws and disconnecting the power and data cables from the crashed drive.

    2.Install the crashed drive into an external hard drive enclosure. This is fairly simple as well, and the procedure is basically just the reverse of what you did to remove the drive in step 1.

    3.Plug this crashed external drive into a functional computer. Under Windows, the drive should be automatically recognized as an external hard drive.

    4.Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the external hard drive. Can you see your files? If so, your files are not totally corrupted and lost, so you will probably be able to get some or all of your documents back with enough effort.

    5.Now try to browse through your folders, if it is working, can simply copy and paste from your crashed drive to the hard drive on the functional system.

    6.If the drive is not working, right click on the drive letter in windows explorer, and go to "properties". Go to the tab "Tools" and you should see "Error Checking". Click on "Check Now". Enable "Automatically fix file system errors" and "Scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors". Then let it run (it may take a while).

    7.If the utility runs all the way through, it may *temporarily* fix your drive. Get all of your data off as soon as you can because your hard drive can (and likely will) crash again, leaving it in an even worse condition.

  • 1 decade ago

    You can try to use the system restore under system tools to restore the settings so that you can access the data on the drive. If you can't even start up the computer, you need to buy a new hard drive and then load Windows or any other OS so that you can use the new hard drive to recover data from the other one. (the data cable needs to be IDE)An advanced method involves using the command prompt, but you still need a working storage device to copy the data onto. If you want to recover all of your drive data, you need a new drive. Once you install the new drive, open the command prompt and type the name of the new drive(C is default), with the computer case open, remove the data cable carefully from the new dive to the old one, and then use the copy command to copy all the data.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    If all alternate attempts fail, & you've got a lot of valuable files that must be recovered, have a look @ 'SpinRite' from GRC.

    Recovers data & fixes HDD errors; disk maintenance; checks cable interfaces; many deep disk checks, ; etc.

    Self contained DOS, so functioning OS not required.

    THE industry standard.

    About $90 US;

    Money back if not satisfied (how many software items have you seen with that?).

    Google for reviews.

    Well worth the money.

    http://www.grc.com/sr/spinrite.htm

    or

    http://www.grc.com/sr/testimonials.htm

    If you decide to give this a try, read the help files on what modes do what, cause it can be a tad confusing. Whatever 'mode' you select, don't be impatient: this works slowly, but methodically, and just may pull your drive back from doom.

    Does not work with newer "solid state" drives, but does work on ANY spinning type (Mac's, Tivo's, game console's, etc.).

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 1 decade ago

    You can take it to a local shop, have them attempt a recovery, and copy your files to CDs or DVDs. I've found Staples to be pretty good at that sort of thing!

    Unfortunately, I can't guarantee what degree of success they'll have but I CAN guarantee it'll get spendy in a hurry. And that's true no matter who does it - whether you send the drive to someone or work with a local shop.

    You're just going to have to weigh how important the files are vs. how costly a recovery will be. Sorry I don't have a more optimistic answer, but that's how it is. Best of luck!

    EDIT - Thumbs-down to Bravo for the copy & paste job.

  • 1 decade ago

    You might need to take the drive out of the machine and put it in a USB enclosure, to run recovery from another machine

    You can try various software to see if the files can be recovered

    DataRescue http://www.prosofteng.com/

    FileSalvage (Mac) http://subrosasoft.com/OSXSoftware/index.php?main_...

    ActiveUndelete http://www.active-undelete.com/

    PCTools FileRecover http://www.pctools.com/file-recover

    Recuva (free): http://www.recuva.com/

    There are some websites that have tools you can try, and then if it looks like it can recover some data, you have to pay to do the recovery

    VirtualLab http://www.binarybiz.com/

    If all else fails, you can send your drive to a data recovery service, it will cost hundreds or thousands of dollars depending on what the problem is.

    If you are going to send it out for recovery, the less fooling around with software you do with the drive on your own, the better.

    Seagate Data Recovery http://services.seagate.com/consumer_solutions.asp...

    DriveSavers http://www.drivesavers.com/

    ActionFront http://www.actionfront.com/

    TotalRecall http://www.totalrecall.com/

  • lakes
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Thats a good question,, lol i by no skill seen that,, have u disposed of the complicated force? that's achievable to connect the force as a slave and reproduction ur song documents,,, many times its in basic terms the MBR on a force thats crashed and not the 'force' yet whilst that's a IDE force u can connect it to the extra desirable connector on the ribbon and examine it like a conventional force,,yet thats a tenet it is achievable the force is thoroughly zapped if so i might call apple they ought to have a answer for that

  • 1 decade ago

    Did you make a back-up disk?

    <3

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    There are places that do Data Recovery and they "ain't" cheap.

    Source(s): Mac, the user friendliest computer on the Planet. Using a Mac since 1992.
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.