Who do you think is the winner?

Robert McClure owned a vehicle salvage and rebuilding business. He listed the business for sale and had a brochure printed that described the business and stated that during 1981, the business grossed $581,117 and netted $142,727, Fred H. Campbell saw the brochure and inquired about buying the business. Campbell... show more Robert McClure owned a vehicle salvage and rebuilding business. He listed the business for sale and had a brochure printed that described the business and stated that during 1981, the business grossed $581,117 and netted $142,727, Fred H. Campbell saw the brochure and inquired about buying the business. Campbell hired a CPA to review McClure’s business records and tax returns, but the CPA could not reconcile them with the income claimed for the business in the brochure. When Campbell asked McClure about the discrepancy, McClure stated that the business records and tax returns did not accurately reflect the cash flow or profits of the business because it was such a high-cash operation that much of the cash was not being reported to the Internal Revenue service on tax returns. McClure signed a warranty that stated that the true income of the business was as represented in the brochure. Campbell bought the business based on these representations. However, the business, although operated in substantially the same manner as when owned by McClure, failed to yield a net income similar to that warranted by McClure. Evidence showed that McClure’s representations were substantially overstated. Campbell sued McClure for damages for fraud.

The question is who wins?
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