I am confused with the root port and designated port in STP..whats the difference and how does it work?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    A non-root bridge will have three types of ports.

    The first port will be the Root Port and this will be the best path to the Root Bridge from this bridge. See my answer to your next question. All other active ports will either be a designated port or an alternate or backup port. An alternate or backup port is a port that also leads to the Root Bridge, but does not provide the best path to the Root Bridge. An alternative or backup port will not carry customer data from this bridge. Any other active port will be a designated port and this is a port that is connected to a bridge that is further downstream from the Root Bridge. So a Root Port and Alternate ports will connect to the upstream bridge's designated port. It may not be obvious but the Root Bridge does not have Root Ports, Alternate Ports nor Backup Ports, it can only have Designated ports.

    If you need a diagram let me know and I will send one.

    Source(s): Telco technician, engineer and instructor since 1971
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  • 3 years ago

    Designated Port Stp

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  • 1 decade ago

    One is the designated port for a given network segment, and the other one points toward the root bridge. One way to think of it, is if the port is up and connected to a "branch" of the tree, then it's a designated port of the switch for that "branch". If the port is facing towards the root, and it's the switch's best path to the root, then it's a "root" port. Also, on a root bridge, since all of its ports are moving away from the root (itself) and towards the branches, all of its ports will be designated ports and not root ports. Make sense?

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  • 3 years ago

    USB is the final with the aid of fact that is would be utilized to connect diverse gadgets to a minimum of one port, many times serial and parallel can try this. Parallel have been very basic for printers and serials have been used for modems before USB got here out. you need to purchase an adaptor to instruct your USB port right into a serial/parallel yet not the way around with the aid of them being very gradual and undesirable at shifting fairly a lot of information. USB is unquestionably a thank you to go. USB V3.0 can do 625MB/2d on an identical time as serial is .18M MB/2d and parallel at 2MB/2d

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  • 1 decade ago
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