Quick fix for a makeshift circuit breaker?

Me and some friends are building a lighting rig where you can turn the lights on then off with a push of a button. [I guess you could think of it as a manual strobe light, but slower.] My idea was rigging a push light [ http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Images/Products/size_3/TLLP05.JPG ] by removing the battery slots,... show more Me and some friends are building a lighting rig where you can turn the lights on then off with a push of a button. [I guess you could think of it as a manual strobe light, but slower.] My idea was rigging a push light [ http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Images/Products/size_3/TLLP05.JPG ] by removing the battery slots, and directly connecting the wires. I would connect one end to a plug and another to another cord, connecting to the main lights. [Flood lights possibly?] We would remove the locking system in the lights, so when it's pushed down, as soon as we let go it goes back to the starting position. This way, the light would turn on quickly, and off quickly, with one push instead of two.

Issues:
- Flood lights use A LOT more watts than the push light. Could that be a major problem? [We don't necessarily need the push light to actually work, just work as a button. [like a doorbell]]
- If light can't take the watt-age, will the button still work? [as in, will the electricity still flow through the light, even if the bulb is dead?]
- Is this even possible?
- We might possible use a dimmer switch, with a push on/off ability. Opinions?


Before you suggest!
- No doorbells! They're not recommended for over about 30 volts. We're planning on using a bit more than that, and don't want it to fail. It's also not 100% reliable.
- No switches! Too cumbersome. We'd be flicking it on and off for half and hour. We don't want callases.

Ex: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1zKx4eyqco [Beware, it's a bit heavy]
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