Jehovah’s Witnesses & Catholics: How can I understand the big difference in false-prophecy between you both?

When we think about false prophesies (i.e., predictions about future events that turned out to be untrue), we see this mostly commonly amongst Jehovah’s Witnesses, Pentecostals (like Benny Hinn), Seventh Day Adventists (like Ellen G White), and so on. But it seems like Jehovah’s Witnesses top the list with 15... show more When we think about false prophesies (i.e., predictions about future events that turned out to be untrue), we see this mostly commonly amongst Jehovah’s Witnesses, Pentecostals (like Benny Hinn), Seventh Day Adventists (like Ellen G White), and so on.

But it seems like Jehovah’s Witnesses top the list with 15 or more major false prophecies.

When one tries to find false prophecies made by Lutherans, Baptists, Catholics, Presbyterians, or any other mainstream (Bible-based religion), they are really hard to find any (I can’t find any).

In fact, I cannot even recall a time when the Pope announced that the world was coming to an end at a particular date. I don’t believe that Lutherans have ever made such announcements either.

I’m trying to understand why this is. There’s nothing at all to prevent a mainstream religion from issuing (false) prophetic statements. Of course, there’s a lot of stuff (historical) that we could criticize Catholics and Lutherans for. But I simply cannot find any false prophecy.

Am I missing something? If not, is there some sort of organizational mechanism within mainstream Christianity that prevents that sort of thing from happening? How does this work?
Update: @Vicarious Cynic: That’s a good point. Going back to the crusades, the whole issue of selling religious artifacts like splinters from the cross of Christ was quite the scam. But I’m not sure those abuses would qualify as false prophesies – which is the topic I’m talking about in this question.
Update 2: @ Robert & Denise: Please reread my question. I was not attacking Catholics. @Alexander: Yes. There’s a passage that says that no man knows the day or the hour. Those who predict the end of the world usually limit their prediction to a particular year. For example, in 1974 the Watchtower Society told its... show more @ Robert & Denise: Please reread my question. I was not attacking Catholics.

@Alexander: Yes. There’s a passage that says that no man knows the day or the hour. Those who predict the end of the world usually limit their prediction to a particular year. For example, in 1974 the Watchtower Society told its members to sell their homes, quit their jobs, and focus full-time on preaching (since, according to them, the world would end in 1975).
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