Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsInfectious Diseases · 1 decade ago

Why do we tend to be more susceptible to the common cold/flu during the Winter season?

Why do we tend to be more susceptible to the common cold/flu during the Winter as opposed during the Summer season?

Please justify your answer (with all the possibilities to explain the nature of it) as there may not be a definitive answer to this question.

Update:

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@ VKT:

NO! Immunity DOES NOT play the main in contracting the flu. However, people who ALREADY HAVE HAD weak immune response or HAVE BEEN immunocompromised due to other illness, such as AIDS, they will have a greater chance to come down with a seasonal flu or any kind of flu for that matter. BUT, if you say by a natural weak immune response in senior citizens due to their old ages & the unfully developed immunities with children that lead to the susceptibility of being infected with cold/flu viruses, then it's NOT correct! Theoretically, the natures (cold T, low humidity) of the cold/flu infections has been consistent with the cases that were studied; however, if that's how we think that the cold & flu are MORE SUSCEPTIBLE during the winter due the fact of low T & low humidity, then how do we explain about those people who live in the areas where there are low T & low humidity ALL YEAR LONG, such as in Russia, Alaska, does that mean they get the cold/flu ALL THE TIME?

Update 2:

The answer is NO....So in a way, the data, the study cases are somewhat consistent to their natures (incubation period); however in other cases like in Russia, Alaska, then it would disprove of what we have been studied so far. So yes, the cold/flu viruses tend to grow at their best @ low T & low humidity; however, it's still inconclusive about its nature of infection during the winter season. My hypothesis is that it might have something to do with the "FLUCTUATION IN TEMPERATURE & HUMIDITY", shifting from the summer (hot & humid) to winter (cold & less humid). But their natures are still poorly understood.

Notice:

There are many viruses that cause A COLD simultaneously.

There are many viruses that cause A FLU simultaneously.

So it's NOT just like 1 virus cause a cold or a flu.

Update 3:

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@ Vicki:

"scientists are not completely sure why the flu season seems to occur in late fall/winter. " <===== GOOD!

3 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Believe it or not, scientists are not completely sure why the flu season seems to occur in late fall/winter. However, most theories center around the hypothesis that winter weather (typically colder and wetter) drives people indoors. The flu is passed through aerosol droplets when people cough or sneeze, and the higher the density of people indoors the greater your chance of becoming infected. The late fall/winter is also the time of year that kids head back to school, so we see an increase in the spread of communicable diseases.

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  • Cheryl
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Try taking fish oil or flax seed oil supplements. Shampoo your hair, rinse, mix half cup of water with half cup apple cider vinegar, pour on hair and let sit for about 3 or 5 or so minutes. Rinse. Shampoo to get smell out. Condition. There are different types of shampoos out there so try alternating...the tar shampoos/neutragenaT Gel,Paul Mitchell Tea Tree, the head and shoulders, and if possible ask your doctor for Nizoral Shampoo. You CAN get Nizoral over the counter but it isn't as good as the prescription and it only cost around 15 bucks and it works REALLY good. It doesn't leave your hair dry and it has a decent smell. The over the counter is 1% and the prescription is 2% and it makes a big difference. Use a good conditioning treatment in your hair once or twice a week by putting it in your hair and cover with a shower cap and hold the hair dryer to it or wrap it in a hot towel from the dryer. Make sure to keep yourself hydrated....drink plenty of liquids and eat vegetables. You might have psoriasis or excema.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    TVK, I totally agree with u. I vote for u.^^

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