Is it true or not true that color television was invented by a mexican?

2or 3 or more persons have told me that the color television was invented by a mexican which i find hard to believe because I believe that I have never heard of a mexican inventing something that is important and transendental, but i seem to remember that i saw an old documentary movie about that on t.v. a few years ago, I believe it was on spanish language television most likely on channel 34 of t.v. but i don't remember on what exact channel I watched that in that documentary they showed all the life story of that mexican that invented the color television and he ended up getting killed in an automobile accident and several people in the u.s.a. were trying to buy off the rights, copyrights to his invention before he died, i believe that they said that his name was ENRIQUE CAMARENA GONZALEZ which kind of strange and odd because i seem to remeber several years ago i saw on t.v. news that an american D.E.A. (Drug Enforcement Agency) agent was killed by mexican drug traffiquers in Mexico and his name was I believe ENRIQUE CAMARENA.

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Guillermo González Camarena

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    Guillermo González CamarenaGuillermo González Camarena (February 17, 1917 – April 18, 1965), was a Mexican engineer who was an inventor of a color-wheel type of color television, and who also introduced color television to Mexico.

    Born in Guadalajara in 1917, his family moved to Mexico City when Guillermo was almost 2 years old. As a boy he made electrically propelled toys, and at the age of twelve built his first Amateur radio.

    In 1930 he graduated from the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineers (ESIME) at the IPN; he obtained his first radio license two years later.

    He was also an avid stargazer; he built his own telescope and became a regular member of the Astronomical Society of Mexico.

    González Camarena invented the "Chromoscopic adapter for television equipment", an early color television transmission system. A U.S. patent application (2,296,019) states:

    “ My invention relates to the transmission and reception of colored pictures or images by wire or wireless... ”

    The invention was designed to be easy to adapt to black-and-white television equipment. González Camarena applied for this patent August 14, 1941 and obtained the patent September 15, 1942. He also filed for additional patents for color television systems in 1960 and 1962.

    On August 31, 1946, González Camarena sent his first color transmission from his lab in the offices of The Mexican League of Radio Experiments, at Lucerna St. #1, in Mexico City. The video signal was transmitted at a frequency of 115 MHz. and the audio in the 40 meter band.

    He obtained authorization to make the first publicly-announced color broadcast in Mexico, on February 8, 1963, Paraíso Infantil, on Mexico City's XHGC-TV, a station that he established in 1952. By that time, the government had adopted NTSC as the television color system.

    He died in a car accident in Puebla on April 18, 1965, returning from inspecting a television transmitter in Las Lajas, Veracruz.

    A field-sequential color television system similar to his Tricolor system was used in NASA's Voyager mission in 1979, to take pictures and video of Jupiter.[1]

    In 1995, a Mexican science research and technology group created La Fundación Guillermo González Camarena (The Guillermo González Camarena Foundation), which benefits creative and talented inventors in Mexico.

    At the same time, the IPN began construction on the Centro de Propiedad Intelectual "Guillermo Gonzalez Camarena" (Guillermo González Camarena Intellectual Property Center).

  • 1 decade ago

    I think this is here because he used the word transcendental in his question, lol.

    To answer your question-

    Guillermo González Camarena invented an early color television system. He received US patent 2296019 on September 15, 1942 for his "chromscopic adapter for television equipment". González Camarena publicly demonstrated his color television with a transmission on August 31, 1946. The color transmission was broadcast direct from the his laboratory in Mexico City.

    Oh, and he died in a car accident in 1965. Not a drug bust.

  • 1 decade ago

    His name was Enrique Gonzales Camarena, and yes he invented the first prototype for the first Color TV, but he didn't have the money to develop it and eventually he had to sell his invention to an American Corporation, and Yes Gonzales Camarena died in a Car Accident.

    Now Enrique Camarena Salazar (1947-1985) was an undercover DEA Agent who was abducted, tortured and killed on Feb 7th 1985 in Mexico, he had infiltrated the Mexican drug traffic Mafia and was passing information to the US authorities.

    So they are two different guys

  • 4 years ago

    When Was Colored Television Invented

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  • 1 decade ago

    Could you be a little more racist? What does a DEA death a few years ago have to do with anything that happened more the 50 years ago?

    Who invented color TV is debatable - it's one of those things where more then one person came up with the elements around the same time. In the 40's great strides were made by inventors in Scotland, Germany and Guillermo González Camarena in Mexico.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    I Think They Really Pushed It When They Started Using The Rhetoric "Show Me Your Papers" It's A FREAKIN ID CARD For Crying Out Loud WHAT AMERICAN CITIZEN Does Not Carry An ID Card ???

  • 1 decade ago

    yes it's true, and your statement that you don't believe mexicans every invented something important and transcendental is racist.

  • 1 decade ago

    YES IS INVENTED BY A MEXICAN

  • 1 decade ago

    unless he was a gay mexican (or EXTREEMLY handsome) we dont care who invented colour tv, we are just glad somebody did.

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