Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 decade ago

What would you say to an atheist who says "Take in God we trust off the dollar bill"?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    "I agree"!

    It's not high on my list of priorities, darling, but I do get so very, very sick and tired of the idiots who think that, because that phrase was added to our money in the 1950s, it means that the founding fathers intended this to be a "Christian nation."

  • 1 decade ago

    Considering the phrase wasn't added to the paper dollar until 1957, I'd be all for taking it off. Maybe the value would go back up :-)

    The extent to which I'd fight to have it removed though is minimal. I'd sign a petition, and that's about it. I don't care what currency says, as long as I can exchange it for something I want.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I wouldn't say anything. What would you say to a creationist who says that Genesis should be taught in public schools ? Or to Fred Phelps when he's picketing a funeral ? Frankly, I think we've all got bigger fish to fry then what's on the dollar bill, like the fact that b/c we let multinationals send all our jobs overseas and b/c we keep bailing out the uber rich, the middle class and the poor are getting royally screwed.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Although I'm probably biased (who isn't?) because I am an atheist, i definitely think it's a valid point. For a country that supposedly keeps the church and the state separate, there are far too many references in things made by our government to God. The Pledge of Allegience, money, swearing on the Bible in the courtroom, and so on. Some people may think I'm just being a jerk, but it's unfair to people who don't share those beliefs. How would you feel if our money said "In Allah we trust" and our Pledge said "One nation, under Zeus"?

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  • 1 decade ago

    The motto as it appears is of only a cloudy value. Any number of quite contradictory and varied religions could view it with approval.

    The issue for me is simply this: When we put "In God We Trust" on our currency, is this just one more lie charged to our collective guilt?

    I think it is... But the answer is not in removing the motto, but in making our nation more in conformity to it.

  • 1 decade ago

    It doesn't bother me that "In God We Trust" is on the dollar bill. It is what it is.

    Source(s): Atheist
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    As an atheist i think it should happen but it is low on my list.

    First would be getting "under god" out of the pledge of allegiance

  • 1 decade ago

    im an atheist and who cares a dollar is still worth a dollar with or without "in god we trust on it"

  • 1 decade ago

    I am an atheist and if he wants that fight he can certainly. I on the other hand if I had the free time and resource would commit it to other more pressing causes.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    "You have too much time on your hands..."

    I would like it gone, but have too much else to worry about to focus on the nonsense that is written on my money... (Not to mention the dozen Masonic Symbols that are all over our currency and our capital...) because I tend to not USE currency any more...

    Though I would like the Pledge of Allegiance returned to its original, pre Cold-War state...

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    The original Pledge of Allegiance never used the words "under God"

    http://www.nobeliefs.com/facts.htm#anchor180705

    The idea for such a pledge probably originated with one of the editors of The Youth's Companion, a magazine for children. By a proclamation from President Benjamin Harrison, the pledge first appeared on October 12, 1892 during Columbus Day observances in public schools. The original wording appears as follows:

    I pledge allegiance to my flag and to the republic for which it stands: one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    Politicians subsequently amended the pledge by the submission of the words: "the flag of the United States of America" for the phrase "my flag." The newly worded pledge got adopted officially on Flag Day, June 14, 1924.

    In 1954, several Christian anti-communists urged a bill to change the pledge further by including "God." Another amended pledge came by a joint resolution of Congress in 1954 with the addition of the words, "under God." The pledge now reads:

    I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands: one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    Unfortunately this pledge does not accurately reflect many Americans who do not believe in gods, and thus it can only stand as a biased an intolerant statement.

    Although the first and second pledge offers a far better alternative than the last, has anyone noticed that the pledge first aims its allegiance to a flag and only secondly to the republic? This gives some reason why the flag presents so many problems with flag burners and with questions of law and the freedom of expression. However it may upset my fellow Americans, I do not pledge allegiance to any symbol including flags or unproven supernatural entities. I do, however, pledge allegiance to the United States, our country. I propose the following pledge:

    I pledge allegiance to the United States of America: one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

    This pledge can conform to any American whether he or she worships a god or has opted for agnosticism, atheism or unbelief.

    Of course we would still perform the pledge in front of the flag, which represents the United States, but the pledge should honor only the United States, not a design on a piece of cloth.

    What do you think?

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