Reconstructionist Jews: Is this correct (see below)?

"They do not believe in a personified deity that is active in history, and they do not believe that G-d chose the Jewish people." ( http://www.jewfaq.org/movement.htm#US ) "Reconstructionist Judaism teaches that the mitzvot are our own invention. Mitzvot are our particularly Jewish ways of... show more "They do not believe in a personified deity that is active in history, and they do not believe that G-d chose the Jewish people." ( http://www.jewfaq.org/movement.htm#US )

"Reconstructionist Judaism teaches that the mitzvot are our own invention. Mitzvot are our particularly Jewish ways of responding to the universal God." ( http://jrf.org/showres&rid=728 )

"We believe “the past does not have a veto.” Therefore we struggle to hear our own voices as distinct from theirs. What might this custom or that idea mean to us today? what might we borrow from this custom to create a new tradition that is more significant for us today. When a particular Jewish value or custom is found wanting, it is our obligation as Jews to find a means to reconstruct it - to find new meanings in old forms or to develop more meaningful, innovative practices." ( http://jrf.org/showres&rid=140 )

"Reconstructionism, which proposes a religious humanist theology, sees God as a Power or Process working through nature and human beings." ( http://jrf.org/showres&rid=487 )

"The words of the Torah, and consequently the mitzvot (including those about prayer) were not literally spoken and commanded by God at Sinai" ( http://jrf.org/showrt&rid=539 )

"Reconstructionist Jew, who does not believe that God hears our prayers or answers our petitions," (ibid)

"Reconstructionism views Judaism as the product of the collective experience of the Jewish people, not as something that God handed down to us in finished form. God, it teaches, should be conceived of as the Creative Goodness in us and around us and not as a person in heaven. Some people are turned off by this idea because they want a God who is responsible for evil as well as good. Kaplan considered the exploration of where evil comes from to be a serious sin. We ought to be so involved in coping with evil and ridding the world of it that we have no time to worry about where it comes from! It certainly doesn’t come from a God who deserves our love and worship.

Reconstructionist Judaism teaches that God is a Process, a Power and a Value in the universe. God is the Zest, the Thrust, the Impetus that goads us to be all that we can be and do all that we can do to make ourselves better than we are and the world better than it is. In short, God is the Wellspring of Goodness in nature and in us (for we, too, are part of nature). God is the Energy enabling us to conquer fear and despair, alienation and loneliness. God is what infuses our lives with confidence, courage and meaningfulness. God is life with a capital “L” and goodness with a capital “G.” " ( http://jrf.org/showrt&rid=524 )

***THE QUESTION:***
All of the above quotes were from the official Reconstructionist webpages (aside from the first one) that explain the tenets and beliefs of Reconstrutionists. My Question is: Based on all of the above diversions from the basic, fundamental, core principles of Judaism, how does Reconstructionist still consider itself to be Judaism?

It appears to me to be more of a "worship of ones-self" as opposed to a religion that worships God. Of course, this is compounded by the fact that Reconstructionists don't exactly believe in God, at least not the God of the Jews.

(I know this has an antagonistic tone to it, please ignore the tone and just answer the question.)
Update: @ Trish - Agreed.
But you sorta dodged the question.
Update 2: @ The Angels, plushy: Thank for your answers, but it appears that you guys don't really subscribe to the official Reconstructionist theology, at least as stated on their website.
Thanks anyways.
Update 3: @ Cher - If those views don't reflect the consensus opinion of Reconstructionist Rabbis, what are they doing on the official Reconstructionist website?
Update 4: @ dowhanawi : That's not what I said at all. In no way was that an ad hominum attack on Reconstrucitonist Jews, it was an inquiry into then nature of Reconstrucitonist Judaism.
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