Can I fly VFR in the instrument meteorological conditions (IMC)?

Situation: The weather is with the ceiling of 1000 feet and visibility of 3000 meters before sunset, but I only can fly VFR.

Can I fly? Is there it? How? What would I need to have?

14 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    No. No matter what you can not fly from VFR into IMC unless you are on an IFR flight plan. Well, you can, but not legally. This is also the leading cause of general aviation fatalities. If your not instrument rated this would be a very poor choice. In your "situation" you could fly and stay below the clouds, but most traffic pattern altitudes are around 1000 ft AGL and this would put you in the clouds while setting up to land. I am a CFI and instrument rated pilot and I would not think about flying unless I was on an IFR flight plan.

  • 1 decade ago

    Can I fly VFR in the instrument meteorological conditions (IMC)?

    The answer to that is no as you cannot see the ground.

    Situation:

    Not likely in the US, as the minimum visibilty is one mile but the ceiling would limit you to 500 feet agl. Since you are using feet for a reference and meters for another, you confuse the matter greatly. See the chart in the reference:

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    >I< am allowed to ooperate in visibilites down to 800 meters by day, out of clouds. legally IMC conditions, maintaining VFR. this sort of operations has certain prerequisities, such as low probability of encountering other traffic, and reduced speed so that the IAS derived by visibility is less than 100, and minimum visibility 800 meters for helicopters, 1.5 km for fixed wings.

    we operate in compliance to JAA.

    your question has two layers , so to say.

    the first layer being the question of law. Yes you are allowed to operate in condition cited, provided the compliance with all applicable rules.

    the second layer being the practical part. if you need to ask such questions HERE.. you should not attempt to fly in such weather.

  • Lisa
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    Except for a Cat III ILS, the autopilot never lands the plane. For a Cat III ILS, with no visibility requirements, the aircraft, crew, and airport all have to be specially certified for the approach. That's not very common. For example, I just checked all of the approaches for airports in 3 states and Washington DC, and only 4 Cat III approaches exist (one at Baltimore, one at Richmond, 2 at Washington Dulles). At no other airports in that region is it possible (or legal) to have the autopilot land the plane. Different types of instrument approaches have different weather minimums, and different minimums for different approach speeds. A standard ILS approach has minimums of 200 ft ceiling and .5 mile visibility. If you reach that altitude on the glideslope and do not have the runway or runway lights in sight, you have to do a missed approach.

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  • 1 decade ago

    In the United States, you may not legally fly under visual flight rules in instrument meteorological conditions.

    The conditions you describe are legal for VFR flight (i.e., they qualify as VMC) during the day in Class G airspace. They are not legal for VFR under any other conditions.

  • 1 decade ago

    not sure about that 3000 meters bullshit. If you are asking about special VFR ( which I think you are) there are ways of flying in reduced visibilty conditions during the day, at night i think the pilot must be IFR qualified in an IFR plane

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It may be legal, but it is extremely unwise.

    If the flight is in uncontrolled airspace, in the US, you can fly with as little as one mile visibility and remain clear of clouds... Some folks refer to that operation as legal suicide, because at 120 kt (~2 mi/min), your visibility is less than 30 seconds' of flying time...

    You become an experienced pilot by not doing stupid stuff... this qualifies as stupid stuff.

  • 1 decade ago

    The answers already posted are enough to tell you no is the best answer, but I would like too add One statement that has served myself and many pilots for many years very well, that is : There are Old Pilots and There are Bold Pilots, But there are " NO " Old Bold Pilots !

    Source(s): Pilot for 33 years
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Stay on the ground.

    Going up in low marginal conditions VFR is stupid.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no ,, but the ATC could give you clearance with special VFR Request ,, only if there is something so important but usually not

    and if you don't have special request then no

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