In the hazen williams formula, the value of the factor C for a certain pipe may be taken as 145?

In the hazen williams formula, the value of the factor C for a certain pipe may be taken as 145. The diameter of the pipe is 16in., its length is 6400ft., and the head tending to cause flow is 52.0ft. The rate of discharge for the pipe , in gallons per minute, is..

A. 4100gpm

B. 3380gpm

C. 2650gpm

D. 1900gpm

Update:

You know what? I would, If this sorry college would give the tools necesesary to do it. I've pulled numerous books from the library to try and help me understand what im looking at. The text book that I have with the quizes inside is only 34 pages long which there is really only 17 pages in the thing. How the heck am I suppose to learn fluid mechanics with only 17 pages? All im asking is for a decent formula that I can use to do it myself....If you feel like entertaining yourself, then feel free to do it, but explain the process when doing it. Im in iraq and have no way of communacating with anyone. So I relly on your answers to help me out. Sorry for inconviniencing you Bomba.

1 Answer

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Hazen-Wiliams Equation

    V = k x C x R^0.63 x S^0.54

    k = 1.318 for US customary Units

    C = roughness coefficient, 145 given

    R = hydraulic radius, 1/3 ft (Area/wetted perimeter, pipe flowing full = d/4 = 16"/4" = 1/3 ft)

    S = slope of energy line, (aka head loss per foot) ft/ft

    ( I used 52 ft of head loss over 6400 ft to see if flow is at or above the given possibilities...which it is.) Normally, head loss (foot per foot) over the 6400 foot pipe run would need to be determined and used for S.

    V = k x C x R^0.63 x S^0.54

    V = ( 1.318 )( 145 )( 1/3 )^0.63 ( 52 / 6400 )^0.54

    V = 7.11 ft/sec

    Q = A V

    Q = ( 16 in / 12 in/ft )( 7.11 ft/sec )( 62.4 lb/ft³ / 8.34 lb/gal)( 60 sec / 1 min )

    Q = 4257 gal / min

    The nearest answer is A at 4100 GPM.

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