Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Entertainment & MusicPolls & Surveys · 1 decade ago

What is the life expectancy of a "Pet Rock"?

I just found one in a box thats about 30 years old. I just cannot tell if its dead or not.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Well.. in rock years, 30 years means it's only a pebble.

    Through the years rocks have proved to be very 'durable' creatures, and under such harsh conditions it may have just gone dormant.

    You should check it's surface for any chipped edges or harsh indents.

    Of course, being kept in solitary confinement for so long can cause even hand-raised rocks to revert to being wild and aggressive.

    ...It'll be almost impossible to retrain. Understand that untamed rocks are unpredictable and can lash out at you at anytime.

    If you still want to keep it, I'd recommend calling a professional animal behaviorist.. but in my opinion the best thing you can do for it now- is to return it's natural environment. It's used to being on it's own, so it'll have no problem relying on instincts. You never know....

    you may come back and find a proud boulder raising pebbles of it's own.

    Source(s): I'm a rock activist. Well not really... hahahaha.
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  • Marie
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    With no offense, your granny may be misinformed. Certainly the links between life extension and pet ownership are abstract, but consider that they give us some other living thing to be responsible for, care about emotionally, enjoy their antics, add variety to what may be a tedious grocery shopping list, etc., hence lessening possible depression, loneliness, and add to a general purpose for living, beyond things like faith, human friends, activities one might engage in. They are also a responsibility to the extreme at times, and as humans do, our pets can become ill, sometimes seriously; costing us money we might not spend otherwise. If/when such a thing happens the caring pet owner sometimes may sacrifice their own wants for the needs of their "charge", thereby adding more purpose. They have feelings, experience pain, I believe levels of joy as well, and though nearly totally dependent on humans, they give as much as they get. Certainly there are instances where animals have injured or even killed humans, and some are reported as having been pets. I wanna suspect that's about as rare as getting hit by a low flying meteor. I've owned and kept animals all my life, growing up on a farm, and don't strictly have a preference for "domesticated" animals. Currently I keep 4 "natural enemies" and they cohabitate because they must. I have a Wolf/Chow, a Siamese Cat, a Lory, and an Albino Corn snake. All are female. If I have any preference it's that I relate better to females, even enjoying the Human variety, smiles. Again, with no offense to Gramma, if/when she reports things like this, just smile, nod your head, perhaps even say "Mmhmm" and allow her to have her opinion. You don't state your grams age, and I wonder if she might not yet be very old? Steven Wolf (The Rev.)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    More like 30 centuries.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I read about this once, and if you poke the rock and it doesn't move you're supposed to give it mouth to mouth every thirty seconds for about 3 hours, if it's still not moving you have a nice healthy pet rock.

    Source(s): Experienced pet rock owner.
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Depends on whether or not there was enough air in the box.

    They can go a long time without eating, but if the box was airtight, fuggetaboutit

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  • They have a half-life of 2 million years.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    nope, they have a life expectancy of over 200 zillion years. Just show it extra love and maybe youll get another 40 zillion out of it, if you're lucky.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Probably dead dude :/

    But I swear I heard a tale of one living eleventeen years.

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  • Glenn
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    pet rocks tend to die fairly quickly, but the bodies decompose at a very slow rate so it is hard to tell when they die, life expectancy...2 years

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  • 1 decade ago

    Oh, dude I know this! I just learned cpr, and luckily for you, we practiced on rocks. I'm here to save the day.

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