what does pumpernickel mean in german?

i know its not the bread it has something to with the devil. and the word before it is like 5 letters long but i have no idea what it is. Does anyone else know? Thanks!

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  • 1 decade ago
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    The Philologist Johann Christoph Adelung states about the Germanic origin of the word, in the vernacular, Pumpen was a New High German synonym for being flatulent, a word similar in meaning to the English "fart", and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick", a familiar name for Satan), or more generally for a malevolent spirit or demon. Cf. also the metal nickel, probably named for a demon that would "change" or contaminate valuable copper with this strange metal that was much harder to work. Hence, pumpernickel is described as the "devil's fart", a definition accepted by the Stopes International Language Database,[2] the publisher Random House,[3] and by some English language dictionaries, including the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.[4] The American Heritage Dictionary adds "so named from being hard to digest." A variant of this explanation is also given by the German etymological dictionary "Kluge" that says that the word pumpernickel is older than its usage for the particular type of bread and may have been used as a mocking name for a person of unrefined manners ("farting nick") first. The change of meaning may have been caused by its use as a mocking expression for the (in the eyes of outsiders) unrefined rye bread produced by the Westphalian population.

    The Oxford English Dictionary, however, does not commit to any particular etymology for the word. It suggests it may mean a lout or booby, but also says, "origin uncertain". The OED currently states the first use in English is from 1756. However, there is an earlier use. An 8 page drinking song titled "Beef and Butt Beer, against Mum and Pumpernickel" was published in London in 1753.[5]

    There is, as well, an often quoted story of how Napoleon while invading Germany was brought dark German rye bread for dinner. He declared that he wouldn't eat it and said instead: "C'est pain pour Nicole!". In other words, it wasn't for him but for his horse, Nicole. "Pain pour Nicole" over time became Pumpernickel. However, according to The Straight Dope, the Napoleon story is an example of folk etymology.

  • 1 decade ago

    From Wikipedia:

    The Philologist Johann Christoph Adelung states about the Germanic origin of the word, in the vernacular, Pumpen was a New High German synonym for being flatulent, a word similar in meaning to the English "fart", and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick", a familiar name for Satan), or more generally for a malevolent spirit or demon. Cf. also the metal nickel, probably named for a demon that would "change" or contaminate valuable copper with this strange metal that was much harder to work. Hence, pumpernickel is described as the "devil's fart", a definition accepted by the Stopes International Language Database,[2] the publisher Random House,[3] and by some English language dictionaries, including the Merriam-Webster Dictionary.[4] The American Heritage Dictionary adds "so named from being hard to digest." A variant of this explanation is also given by the German etymological dictionary "Kluge" that says that the word pumpernickel is older than its usage for the particular type of bread and may have been used as a mocking name for a person of unrefined manners ("farting nick") first. The change of meaning may have been caused by its use as a mocking expression for the (in the eyes of outsiders) unrefined rye bread produced by the Westphalian population.

    The Oxford English Dictionary, however, does not commit to any particular etymology for the word. It suggests it may mean a lout or booby, but also says, "origin uncertain". The OED currently states the first use in English is from 1756. However, there is an earlier use. An 8 page drinking song titled "Beef and Butt Beer, against Mum and Pumpernickel" was published in London in 1753.[5]

    There is, as well, an often quoted story of how Napoleon while invading Germany was brought dark German rye bread for dinner. He declared that he wouldn't eat it and said instead: "C'est pain pour Nicole!". In other words, it wasn't for him but for his horse, Nicole. "Pain pour Nicole" over time became Pumpernickel. However, according to The Straight Dope, the Napoleon story is an example of folk etymology.[6]

  • 4 years ago

    What Is Pumpernickel

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    what does pumpernickel mean in german?

    i know its not the bread it has something to with the devil. and the word before it is like 5 letters long but i have no idea what it is. Does anyone else know? Thanks!

    Source(s): pumpernickel german: https://shortly.im/g1gAG
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  • Chad F
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    You aren't going to believe this, but it translates to "Devil's Fart". The Germanic origin of the word, in the vernacular, Pumpen was a New High German synonym for being flatulent, a word similar in meaning to the English "fart". Nickel came from "Old Nick", which was a synonym for devil, evil spirit, or demon. Yes...this etymology is actually accepted in Merriam Webster's Dictionary.

    Source(s): Cross referenced several sites.
  • Rain
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Pumpernickel is a type of very heavy, slightly sweet rye bread, originally from Germany.

  • 1 decade ago

    Nickel is a derivation of Devil ("Old Nick"}. According to one web site it apparently means "devil's fart."

    Source(s): WikiAnswers.com
  • 4 years ago

    Fart Goblin

  • 7 years ago

    It translates to "Fart Goblin"

  • 1 decade ago

    actually i don't know but it may be pomegranate

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