promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 decade ago

how to kill amocking bird?

in what ways would the childhood experiences recounted in 2 kill a mocking bird help jean louise finch to grow into a compassoinate less prejudiced adult? please and thanks alot!!!

8 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Her childhood experiences force Scout (Jean Louise Finch) to grow up before her time. She is faced with situations that destroy her innocence and take her from the simple life of a child and turn her overnight into someone more mature. In a way, she is a child with an adultlike mind.

    In spite of her age, she is able to think and reason. She tries to understand what is supposedly so very wrong with her father defending Tom Robinson. For herself, Tom's being black means nothing. It does not make him into a criminal or an outcast as others in Maycomb tend to believe. Atticus finds nothing wrong in defending Tom. He has brought up his children in the same way. Besides, he speaks openly before Calpurnia, who is black, but does not treat her differently simply because she is black.

    Scout finds things wrong about the whole situation. She even goes to the extent of questioning her teacher's reactions. In class, Miss Gates criticizes Hitler for his persecution of the Jews. When it comes to herself though, Scout hears her telling Miss Stephanie Crawford that it is time someone taught the blacks a lesson. Scout is aghast at such a reaction.

    Although she is a child, Scout feels that so much prejudice and hate for the black is wrong.She would fight it if she could but Atticus asks her not to, so she has to bear with the criticisms about Atticus being a '******-lover', etc, even from her cousin Francis.

    Thanks to Atticus’s wisdom, Scout learns that though humanity has a great capacity for evil, it also has a great capacity for good, and that the evil can often be mitigated if one approaches others with an outlook of sympathy and understanding. Scout’s development into a person capable of assuming that outlook marks the culmination of the novel and indicates that, whatever evil she encounters, she will retain her conscience without becoming cynical or jaded. Though she is still a child at the end of the book, Scout’s perspective on life develops from that of an innocent child into that of a near grown-up.(This paragraph's directly from sparknotes)

    Hope this helps!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    i agree, read the book. and if you did, its kinda common sense. cause UM, lets see... her father was like, the LEAST prejudiced man of all time. he helped tom robinson and actually tried to save his life even though he was of colour and even though everyone in the town hated him. she also saw how coloured people were treated and since atticus was her father, she saw it from the point of view of an unprejudiced person. she also was taught by her father not to be prejudiced agains't boo radley, even though he was different. he also told her to stop tormenting him and, before judging someone, you should walk around in their shoes (see it from the other person's point of view.) hope this helped! :) but i do think you should read the book, its good!

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Social injustices demonstrated during the Tom Robinson trial.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    It is about two kids that grow up in a community and are afraid of this one person. The book is filled with racism and is a great book.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    to kill a mocking bird first you grab it and hold it in your left hand. then you place your lips over it head and your teeth on its neck. then you simply bite down until the wings stop flapping and it stops twitching. the end

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Too bad you will not enjoy the book and do the work yourself. Lucky you to have so many folks on here who will do your homework for you.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Read the book.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.