are vikings still alive????

12 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    The vikings themselves are not still alive and their cultrue is in all practicality dead (although there may still be a few dozen people who live entirely like vikings did). However, there are still Descendants of vikings very much alive. Most of the population of Sweden and Norway are of Viking descent, and a significant number of British and French have viking blood in them. There are also tons of re-enactment groups who regularly re-enact viking culture, and the number of them mean it is not hard to find one and get a taste of Viking culture and life.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    In Iceland you find the most direct line of descendants of Vikings, Sweden, Norway and Denmark too, but the Islandic people have been cut off from other cultures and races for longer. The Viking spirit in Scandinavia is all but dead though, Swedes especially wouldn't be able to defend a mouse from a kitten.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Alva
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago

    No !! Vikings were one of the Norse (Scandinavian) explorers, warriors, merchants, and pirates who raided and colonized wide areas of Europe from the late eighth to the early eleventh century. This period of Viking expansion is known as the Viking Age, and forms a major part of the medieval history of Scandinavia, Britain, Ireland and the rest of Europe in general.

    However, after this point vikings went into decline and eventually became extinct. This was a result of several factors, firstly, as the new quasi-feudalistic system became entrenched in Scandinavian rule, organized opposition sealed the Vikings' fate. Eleventh-century chronicles note Scandinavian attempts to combat the Vikings from the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea, which eventually led to Danish and Swedish participation in the Baltic Crusades during the 12th and 13th centuries. It also contributed to the development of the Hanseatic League.

    One of the primary profit centers of Viking trade was slavery. The Church took a position that Christians should not own fellow Christians as slaves, so chattel slavery diminished as a practice throughout Northern Europe. Eventually, outright slavery was outlawed, replaced with serfdom at the bottom rung of Medieval society. This took much of the economic incentive out of raiding, though sporadic activity continued for a few decades beyond the Norman conquest of England.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 5 years ago

    Yes, they are still alive today, just not called Vikings anymore. I am a descendent of the Vikings myself. Also an Anglo Saxon descendent.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The Vikings came from Scandinavia in Northern Europe, people who live in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, North Germany and so on are all descendants from Vikings.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    In 793 AD, an anguished Alcuin of York wrote to the Higbald, the bishop of Lindisfarne and to Ethelred, King of Northumbria, bemoaning the unexpected attack on the monastery of Lindisfarne by Viking raiders, probably Norwegians sailing directly across the North Sea to Northumbria.

    It is clear from the letter that Lindisfarne was not destroyed. Alcuin suggested that further attack might be averted by moral reform in the monastery.

    Over the next few decades, many monasteries in the north were destroyed, and with them any records they might have kept of the raids. We know no historical details of the raids in Scotland, although they must have been extensive.

    Iona was burnt in 802 AD, and 68 monks were killed in another raid in 806 AD. The remaining monks fled to Kells (County Meath, Ireland) with a gospel-book probably produced in Iona, but now known as the 'Book of Kells'.

    Other monasteries in Scotland and northern England simply disappear from the record. Lindisfarne was abandoned, and the monks trailed around northern England with their greatest possession, the relics of St Cuthbert, until they found a home in Durham in 995 AD.

    In 800 the Vikings met up with Picts and the Celts in Briton.. Iona was burned and the monks were killed...altho...other monks escaped to Northern Ireland with the Book of Kells which later became the Knights Templar and the relics and books were delivered from there to a place of refuge.

    The Vikings and Picts and Celts intermarried with the Britons, which became Scot or our Scotland....we of that ancestral are alive today.

    Yes Virginia, Vikings are alive and well as is the Knights Protectors.

    Source(s): BBC History My common knowledge.
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    It's important to distinguish between the people who are associated with "Vikings" and the act of going "A-Viking."

    Vikings were Norse (Norwegian, Swedish and Danish, principally) raiders. Not all the Norse were Vikings, and most of those who were spent much of their year as farmers and fishermen.

    As such, yes, the cultures which spawned the Vikings are still with us. Norway, Sweden and Denmark are full of them.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, in a way.

    There is a faith referred to as Asatru which is also referred to as Odinism. It is a belief in the Norse way of life and faith. Now, they typically don't go Aviking to rape, pillage, and plunder, but the same ideals are held as important.

    If you look at Northern Germany, Scandenavia, Norway, and even the U.S., you will find worshipers of Odin, Thor, and the Norse Gods.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 decade ago

    Sure ! Minnesota is swarming with Them ! :)

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No that football team looks and acts dead.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.