How do I get rid of barn swallows?

Every June/July these sleek birds come and try to build nests right above my front and back doors. I've tried cotton balls, and the reflections of CD's to scare them away. I take down there attempts at building a nest everyday. Its annoying. These birds swoop at me also. How can I make them go away for good?

11 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    bb gun

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    why do you need to get rid of them? Destroying their nests is destroying the baby chicks' homes! And they are swooping at you because they are trying to protect their nests ... On a positive note, they eat flying insects so at least you won't have bugs in your house.

    Swallows are attracted to open spaces and water (lakes, rivers). So chances are if you live somewhere like this, you are in the swallows' preferred nesting areas.

    Sorry not to be more helpful, but I find it hard to understand why you would want to drive these lovely birds away from their nests :-(

  • 4 years ago

    Nest removal: At the first sign of nest building, remove the nest. Note: All swallows are protected under the law. You cannot disturb them once they lay their eggs in the nest (see “Legal Status”). Usually nests can be washed down with a water hose or knocked down with a pole. Because swallows are persistent at rebuilding nests, you will need to continually remove the nest mud for several days until the birds stop. Swallows are strongly attracted to old nests or to the remnants of deteriorated nests, so all traces of mud should be removed. Swallows are federally protected. Any permit to lethally control these species would need to be issued from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and would only be issued in very extreme cases. Some examples are concerns for aircraft safety from a nesting colony at an airport or potential food contamination from a colony over a loading area at a food-processing center. In most cases a permit for lethal control will not be issued for swallows nesting on a residence or other buildings and causing aesthetic damage. A permit is not required to remove swallow nests under construction that do not contain an adult, any new eggs or young, or nests abandoned after the breeding season. If an adult swallow is occupying a half-built nest, or a fully built nest without eggs, then the law protects it. Additional Information I’ve been noticing quite a few swallows, swifts, and martins. So I’ve done a little research on this summer trio. Believe it or not, these three species of birds give us a lot to be thankful for. They eat the majority of those nasty little mosquitos as they fly through the air, making us wish there were more of them so we could watch and see just how graceful they really are. Unfortunately, most species of swallows that migrate regularly, don’t stay very long in any one area...even though their human hosts wish they would! Two of the most popular swallows that reside in the United States are the Barn Swallow, and the Tree Swallow. Tree swallows can be more elusive than their barn dwelling counterparts mainly due to the fact that it is very hard to pinpoint their nests. During this reading, we’re concentrating mainly on the Barn Swallow. Barn Swallows This is the only swallow that is known to have the true swallow-type, forked tale. Ranging around 6-7 ½” long, they are a shiny dark blue in color with white spots and a rusty cinnamon color on the underside of the body. The Barn swallow winters in Costa Rica, on down to Argentina, Africa, and south Asia. Barn swallows return year after year to the same well-engineered house or nest that they originally built. They build their nests of mud, hair, and grass. It’s a cone shaped dwelling with thick walls (approx. 1”). Usually, the opening at the top of the nest is located near the ceiling of the wall that is used as a base for the mud bottom of the nest. They reside in pairs, sometimes forming small communities, and work together for the protection of their young and their nests. This species flies very close to the ground. There is little gliding and a lot of wing-flapping. It is not unusual to see Barn swallows displaying amazing courage as they bomb-dive cats, dogs, and other animals that come too close to their dwellings. My little dog has had his share of attacks! Actually, there are about seventy-five species of swallows in the world today. They tend to have slim bodies that are almost streamlined in appearance. They all tend to have long wings that are pointed, and beaks that are able to gape open; an asset to their ability to feed on insects while in flight.

  • 1 decade ago

    Taser,paintballgun,bb gun. Get some bird seed and soak it in some household chemical then spread it around the barn as long as you have no dogs or anything.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Owls. Get large plastic owls or other birds of prey (falcons, etc.) and put them up everywhere.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Get a barn cat.

    Simple solutions are often overlooked. ;)

  • casey.
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    get a barn cat

    Source(s): we did and it works
  • 1 decade ago

    Bear trap.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    throw them up

  • 1 decade ago

    burn the barn. with napalm.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    burn your barn

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