Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Games & RecreationHobbies & Crafts · 1 decade ago

How do you cast on in the middle of a knitted fabric?

http://www.knittingatknoon.com/fingerlessmittenpat...

I'm supposed to cast on two stitches.

Please help, thanks.

4 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    You knit into the stitch, but instead of finishing it, you take the loop and put it on your left hand needle. Then you do the same thing to the loop you just made until you have the desired number of stitches you need.

    Hope this helps.

  • 1 decade ago

    You don't. That is not how it's done. You can cast on at the beginning or end of a row, but not in the middle of it. If it's in the middle of a row, it's called an increase. Different thing.

    If you read the directions, it says: "knit in front and back (kfb) of first st". What part of that don't you understand? This is one way to make an increase, not one of my favourites, but may work in this case. There are many different ways to increase. This is all covered in your beginner knitting class... did you miss that lesson?

    Any time you need help, you always go to http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/increases

  • 1 decade ago

    If you search for knitting lessons online you will find sites where they show with pictures you how to increase while knitting.

    Another way would be to stop in at a yarn store in your area one evening. Most stores have groups of people who sit around knitting in the evening. Someone will be able to help you in person.

    By the way, it is only good manners to buy some small item if you expect their help. It is a store, not a charity. This is especially true if you did not buy the yarn for the project from them, and you are not a customer of the store.

  • 1 decade ago

    Dolly O is correct - but if you are to cast on in a purl row , purl to cast on the stitches.

    Hairbender didn't read the pattern through properly or has obviously never knitted gloves.

    Sorry Hairbender, I usually agree with your answers

    Source(s): knitter of many , many, many gloves over the last 40 years
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