Do I need an EIN for a non-profit organization in NYS?

So, I'd like to start a non-profit organization in NYS.

Help the community, donate items to teen parent programs, charity programs etc.

I've been doing research and can't seem to word my searches right lol. Do I need an EIN for a non-profit organization, or how do I sign up to be tax exempt for such a thing?

3 Answers

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  • Viv'
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    so there are 2 possibilities - and Employer Identification Number - a nine-digit number assigned by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to business entities operating in the United States for the purposes of identification. or a TIN - Tax Identification Number - a number used for identification rather than employment tax reporting.

    So if you want a number for tax payment get an EIN. If you want it for Identification purpsoses, get a TIN.

    Good luck to you!

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    There is a BIG difference between TAX FREE or EXEMPT, and Non-profit_organizations. However, within many Churches, there are held 4013C-titles to many Non-profit_organizations; Also there are a lot of Jet-Setting Preacher-Men. Here: Go read every thing you would ever want to know about, how to and what about, Contents [hide] 1 Non-profit distinction 2 Nature and goals 3 Legal aspects 3.1 Formation and structure 3.2 Tax exemption 3.3 United States 3.4 Canada 3.5 India 3.6 United Kingdom 4 Issues faced by NPOs 5 Examples 6 On the Internet 7 Other terminology for the sector 8 See also 9 External links 10 References

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I'm so tired of seeing this question here.

    An EIN is an EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER.

    You need it.

    You may be capable and sincere, but there are some things you need to know.

    1. A nonprofit is not a get-rich-quick scheme. It requires an enormous amount of time and work to get if off the ground, and able to sustain itself.

    2. There are THOUSANDS of regulations. Yes, really.

    3. The nonprofit CORPORATION is tax exempt. Employees still pay taxes under the same rules as everyone else.

    4. It is a waste of everyone's time and money if you plan to reinvent the wheel. There are most likely hundreds of other nonprofits already out there doing the same work that you plan to do. You should find a few and volunteer. You have a lot to learn.

    5. People are not going to hand you buckets of money just because you have a "charity".

    Like I said, you may be the exception, but I see so many pie-in-the-sky dimwits here.

    But if you insist.

    There is no "best way".

    There is only one way.

    First, you have to incorporate in your home state.

    That takes weeks and $hundreds$.

    Then you apply to the IRS for tax exempt status.

    That's several more weeks.

    THEN you begin fundraisiing.

    That's months.

    Meanwhile, you establish your by-laws, board of directors, staff, and internal policies.

    You will need an office, accounting system, bank accounts, and insurance.

    THEN you begin your work.

    Then you continue fundraising.

    Then more fundraising.

    Then even more fundraising.

    Then you do some more work.

    Then you apply to foundations for money.

    The foundations will come to your office and tell you you're doing it all wrong.

    Then you file reports with the government.

    Then you do some fundraising.

    Then more work.

    go to www.irs.gov.

    Click "charities and nonprofits"

    go to www.usa.gov

    click "for businesses and nonprofits"

    go to www.foundationcenter.org

    lots of info there.

    Good luck.

    Source(s): 26 years as volunteer, staff, manager, board member, and consultant to nonprofit corporations.
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