What's the best way to address a Christian asking you if you have Jesus while you're at work?

I work in the health care field am I'm merely trying to do my job as a nurse . . . making sure that your medications are correct, that I draw your blood on the first attempt when possible and that you are comfortable. Occasionally during my professional duties I come across Christians that ask me if I believe... show more I work in the health care field am I'm merely trying to do my job as a nurse . . . making sure that your medications are correct, that I draw your blood on the first attempt when possible and that you are comfortable. Occasionally during my professional duties I come across Christians that ask me if I believe in Jesus or want to begin a witnessing process. I find this awkward. I feel that unless I say that I believe in Jesus that the patient will stop taking me seriously and be personally offended -- I've seen it happen.

So, what's the right answer? I don't want to get too technical with these patients like telling them I'm a pantheist like Spinoza and Einstein -- this is just too much information that can be confusing to most people. Plus these thoughts are my personal belief system and I'd rather not go into this at work with patients.

So, what do you think would be an appropriate answer that would allow me to both tell the truth while giving them a satisfactory answer.

And I'm serious here, so please no vulgar stuff because I wouldn't say that to a patient under any circumstances.
Update 2: I searched through our company policy & procedures, but couldn't locate anything at this time that indicates I can't talk about religion, politics, money or other "taboo" subjects w/patients. It may be in the employee handbook which I don't have access to at the moment. However, there is a... show more I searched through our company policy & procedures, but couldn't locate anything at this time that indicates I can't talk about religion, politics, money or other "taboo" subjects w/patients. It may be in the employee handbook which I don't have access to at the moment. However, there is a policy that supports getting the chaplain if a patient has prayer/baptism requests. Another policy also respects the health care provider in that if the person's religious views interfere w/taking care of the patient adequately that they may request another person to take over for them if available.

Now, I don't feel I need to have someone take over for me when a person is wanting to inquire as my religious beliefs. I also don't feel I need to get a chaplain involved because this person isn't asking for something like prayer or that their religious convinctions be respected; it's more about finding out what "kind" of person I may be and/or "helping" me.

See part II - Hatching's answer.
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