What is correct .... “is complete/completed”.....?

What is correct .... “is complete/completed”.....???

For example in the following sentence:

The actual change will not take effect until the status stage of this command is successfully complete/completed.

>> I think “complete is only correct. Complete is an adj. and successfully is the adv. that tells more about adj. that follows.

One can also use done/accomplished in place of complete. But I guess using completed would be wrong.

On http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/9925... it is

mentioned that both the statements given below are correct.

1a. Your credit is being processed. As soon as this transaction is

complete, you will receive an email confirmation.

1b. Your credit is being processed. As soon as this transaction is

completed, you will receive an email confirmation.

It is also mentioned on the site that difference in their meaning is: [but it still not clear to me  ]

1a means => All in order

1b means => Finished

Can someone explain if 1b is grammatically 100% correct?

Can someone help me understand what is the difference in their meaning, if any?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Completed is the correct form for both your examples.

    Both sentences involve an action, and when that action is finished, it is "completed."

    Complete is mainly an adjectve. "A complete idiot." "A complete set of cards."

    If you filled out a form incompletely, someone might say to you, "You haven't filled out the form completely."

  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is correct .... “is complete/completed”.....?

    What is correct .... “is complete/completed”.....???

    For example in the following sentence:

    The actual change will not take effect until the status stage of this command is successfully complete/completed.

    >> I think “complete is only correct. Complete is an adj. and successfully is the...

    Source(s): correct complete completed: https://tinyurl.im/ogWq7
  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avzjN

    I used to "break" my dogs from being under a command using the word "ok"...30 years later I use the word "free" and I use it for a reason. Here is my logic on this and I hope it answers your question. If the dog is under the "platz" command and I am done, I will tell him "free". That does not mean, in my mind, that he HAS to get up, he can if he wants to, but, it is NOT a command...he is simply being released. If my dog came to the heal position on his one while I am just standing there and then after looking at me, walked away, that is ok, he will not be corrected because in my mind, even though he offered, he was not under obligation. If I came in the room and he looked at me and went to the down position, I would look around to see what he was into, then, go about my business. I do not correct a dog that was not under command by me to do anything specific. Not sure if that is what you want to hear, but, if you want to philosophize, you know what to do....hope I helped!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    your example is wrong. completed is past-tense. so it's already been done. 1b works because the credit is still being processed.it hasn't finishes-so either works because when it is finished it will have been completed, but the other works because it isn't yet past-tense.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.