Faraday Cage question?

This question is about a faraday cage in connection with alternating current (skin effect), more specifically lightning. First I want to ask about the size of the holes in between the mesh of the cage. For electromagnetic waves, the holes in the mesh need to be smaller than the wave length of the waves to be... show more This question is about a faraday cage in connection with alternating current (skin effect), more specifically lightning.
First I want to ask about the size of the holes in between the mesh of the cage. For electromagnetic waves, the holes in the mesh need to be smaller than the wave length of the waves to be guarded against. Does this also apply to a direct connection, meaning not via electromagnetic waves but via a wire (or lightning strike) that touches the outside of the cage?
This leads to my next question; when I look at the lightning rods in houses, often they have one wire on each corner going down the house. If I look at the "holes" in the mesh, they are really big. Either the wavelength of the lightning strike is much greater than the gaps or a different principal applies since we are not talking about electromagnetic waves (hence my first question).

My final two questions are about lightning protection inside a house that does not have lightning rods. Can I build a cage similar to a roll cage in a race car that encompasses the bed or perhaps an entire room and be completely save from lightning while inside?
This cage would probably not be grounded but that isn't a requirement for a faraday cage.
What spacing would I need to guard against lightning, i.e. would a conductor along the corners of a cubical room suffice?

The reason I'm asking is because I'm moving into a house that is on the top of a hill and unprotected. I read that only 20% of the people die that get hit by lightning but the remaining people most likely suffer from lifelong pain and disabilities. I don't want to take my chances.
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