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Melissa S asked in PetsHorses · 1 decade ago

Why am I scared of my horse?

I ride this horse that bronks badly. SERIOUSLY he's got my instructor off! I'll get on and ride him propperly, but as soon as he bronks it really puts me off and I ride really pathetically.

I don't get why I'm scared though because he's never got me off and I know I can sit to him. I ride naughty horses all the time without a problem. How can I get over my fear and ride him?

Please don't say, 'don't ride him' etc because he's so nice when he doesn't bronk and when I ride him well. It just all goes wrong when he bucks.

19 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    o kay ...diciapline him get a crop and when he bucks smack his butt. it sounds mean but it works .he needs to respect you .so if you fall get your crop and while you are on the ground give him a good smack and then get back on and see what he does. if he bucks smack him harder if he doesnt reward him with a treat . get angry not scared trust me i was afraid of my horse too at one point

    Source(s): my 8 years of horse back riding
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  • zakiit
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Even riding instructors can get thrown from time to time if the horse twists or lands in a particularly awkward way.

    You seem to have got him sussed most of the time.

    Do you know why he bucks? Is it excess energy, a pain in his back or does his saddle fit badly? Only the riding school can make these checks via chiropracters, saddlers etc. He might just be picking up on your fear and trying to frighten you more to get away with not working too hard, or not at all. A horse that bucks or rears is usually thinking backwards so it is important to ride him forward.

    What you need to do is to get really angry. Think of somebody or something you really hate, sit down, lift one hand drop it and lift the other and kick seven bells out of him. It sounds cruel, but if you ride strongly forward he cannot buck. As soon as he is going a bit more forward, even if it is in canter, let him go for a bit, but do not let him stop until YOU say! Be careful to use your legs and seat.

    If it is excess energy, ask for him to be lunged or free schooled before you get on. If he has never had you off, you are probably alright. Just lacking in self confidence.

    Source(s): Riding instructor
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  • 1 decade ago

    I agree with devilrider. You need to punish him for bucking. Passive's idea works sometimes IF you are a good enough rider and your horse isn't serious about getting you off. If the horse is serious and wants you off then 99% of the riders are going to be coming off, one way or the other.

    One thing that has worked for me on such horses is a curb bit with a mullen port and locking my arms when they try to buck. the mullen port protects their tongue but when they throw their head down they are brought up suddenly short by a set of arms that does not go down (sometimes I rest them against the saddle pommel to prevent any give at all). Sometimes they will try it once or twice more (usually not nearly as hard) but after that I have little or no trouble again. However, I catch it before the bucking has ever commenced to begin with. So the horse has never been rewarded for bucking by any change in my riding. I honestly believe that is part of why with all the horses I have trained I have yet to be seriously bucked, let alone actually come off from a buck. I prevent it before the first buck ever comes.

    However I feel that that technique will not work on your horse since he is already bucking.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Ok, first make sure his legs, stifle,back and teeth are not sore. Then make sure all of his tack fits properly. Now, when he bucks pull his head up firmly (not harshly though!) and nudge him on with your heels. If you get him moving, without smacking him, and once he is moving make sure you are prepared to pull his head up again. Don't smack him, he will get angrier and buck you more! Try to figure out why hes bucking! Is he scared of something? Is young and play full? Or are the other horses near him that he doesn't like? If there is try to eliminate the reasons. Also try free lunging him before you ride him before you tack him up to get rid of any extra energy that he has!

    Praise him when he behaves! Good luck! Good job for being able to sit his crazy bucks!

    Source(s): Practising to be a problem horse trainer
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  • 1 decade ago

    If you are able, find a different insturcter/trainer. How can you be expected to resolve this situation if the person who is teaching you cant even do it. i'm sure your instructor has been helpful to you in the past but they are in over their head with this horse.

    also, you might wish to explore acupuncture with a certified practioner.

    they are just so fantastic, and are able to offer insights into any possible phyiscal malady which might be affecting your horse casuing him to buck. people are often far too quick to rule out physical issues when in fact 95% it is an underlying phyiscal conditon which creates performance and behavioral problems. a full work up with an acupunctorist will range from $80 to $125 per session and is worth every penny.

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  • 1 decade ago

    First of all rule out that there is no medical reason he is bucking and make sure your saddle doesn't pinch him. Secondly, a horse has a harder time bucking if his head is up. They usually give small warning signs when he is getting ready to, so prepare by getting his head up. After being successful with this a few times your confidence will probably come back slowly. Your trainer should be finding out why he is bucking though and be keeping you safe. It's most likely a behavioral problem that needs solved and if she can't figure it out than she is not a good trainer, and you need to find a new one, or just buy a new horse.

    Source(s): I am horse trainer and have been on plenty of bucking horses
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Yea I agree with disiplining him when he bucks it sort of worked for my horse he use to buck a lot but he doesn't anymore we had to try a lot of different methods to get him to stop because his previous owner abused him he was use to the pain so it didn't affect him so instead when he would buck I would take my had and hit him gently on the head I know it doesn't sound like much but it worked the do say that communication is key and what better way to communicate than with your hands?

    Source(s): ME
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  • 1 decade ago

    You need to correct his bucking behavior rather then just sitting it...

    Get a crop, or a set of leather split reins, and as soon as she humps up, start spanking him... Spank him hard and kick... He can't bronc if he is running... The unexpected reaction you give him with make him forget bucking and he'll run out of it...

    You have to correct his bucking... Don't let him bronc, let him put the hump in his back to bronc then react... Spank him hard and kick him hard and as soon as he steps out of it, stop kicking and spanking...

    He'll quickly learn that him doing something naughty will recieve a responce that he doesn't like...

    And as for your fear... The first time you set foot on a horse with completely no fear is the time you are going to get hurt...

    You are afraid of hitting the ground is why you are afraid after he bucking and acts a fool...

    Like I said, correct it and once he stops bucking, you'll ride confidently all the time

    I went back and read allot of the answers... I don't agree with most that say you should coddle your horse...

    You are the dominent one in the relationship, you tell the horse what to do...

    Also by stopping this horse or getting off him, you are giving him the exact thing he wants..

    You have to stay on and you have to make him go forward.. If you stop him, your rewarding him since horses are naturally very lazy animals... You rarely see them running around in the feild...most of the time they are grazing happily at a near stand still..

    I am supposing you checked his tack and for soreness before is why I didn't comment on it...

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  • 1 decade ago

    Just remember that you ARE in control.

    I know bucking throws off the riding well thing a bit, but when he bucks, pull the reins UP not back, and kick kick kick! He needs to learn not to buck soon, so you should start since it seems like your trainer isn't doing much about it.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Go up to him straight away and get on him. No cuddling or carrots, just get straight on him and go to the arena

    Walk round for about 10 mins, and do the same in trot.

    Try canter as well, if he starts bucking....

    Hold on really tight. It might help to hold the pommel.

    Do not pull him to stop. Let him do whatever, let him charge around the arena until he stops for a moment.

    Get off him. Don't stroke or feed him. Make sure his reins will not be in the way, and let him go.

    Watch him, let him buck and gallop all he wants, do whatever.

    He will get bored eventually, and let him catch you. Lunge him around until he is calm.

    Get on him. Walk for a whole circuit, then trot for one, Then do a tiny canter. Do this every day if he plays up. Spend quality time with him between lessons so he knows you are not suddenly not letting him get away with things, do it slowly, he'll learn.

    Hope this helps

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I had this problem with a mare. Like some of the other posters said I would push her forward as soon as she started to buck. I would push her forward hard for just a few seconds, quickly and abruptly ask her to stop (be sure to sit deep :P), I would give her maybe 2 seconds and pull her in a tight circle or two. Then immediately I would ask her to walk in the direction I wanted. It really really helped with her and broke her completely. But be sure to "feel" for bucking coming so you can be ready to correct him. It does take time so this is not a quick fix. But once they realize that you are in control it gets much easier. I tried the crop with her one time and tapping her with it completely shut her down. She didn't understand that at all and just stopped moving all together. I felt really bad. Of course everyone else is correct be sure to check his tack. GL!!

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