Planning to have my newborn sleep on her belly... anyone else agree?

HI! I am due in late August with a little girl. I have done a lot of research on back vs belly sleeping and I have decided to go with belly sleeping. Here is why: I have read article after article on WebMD and accredited sites like that (as well as books) about belly vs back. Every single one says to put the baby to sleep on their back. (The only one that says Belly is by a very famous, now retired, Pediatrician Dr. Denmark of Atlanta. Several of my friends were her patients. ) They say that the child's risk of suffocating is greatly increased when they lie on their bellies on a soft mattress. The key part is the soft mattress. It creates a pocket of Co2 and there is not enough air circulation and the baby suffocates. What if you fix the two main problems? Get a firm mattress and have good air circulation. I have not come across a single article that does not include soft mattress and poor air circulation to the problems with belly sleeping. There has also been research to show that babies actually sleep better on their bellies, when they are on their backs, they get the "falling" sensation and are easily startled by it and wake themselves up. Developmentally it is good for babies to be on their bellies, thus we have tummy time mats now to help them develop their back and neck muscles. The scare is that when placed on their bellies to sleep is that they do not know how to turn their heads, but it is a natural movement for them and they do turn their heads to the side. My husband and I were both belly sleepers as babies. The tricky thing with SIDS is that it has no rhyme or reason as to why it happens. Suffocation, on the other hand, can be prevented. Make sure there are no blankets or stuffed animals in the bed, have a firm mattress, good air circulation. Things like that are preventable, SIDS is not. I feel that if I do everything to keep my baby safe, weather it is to put her to sleep on her back or her belly and she still dies of SIDS, then there was nothing I could have done to prevent it. This is just my opinion and I've done the research and still have chosen belly. Thanks for reading and I was just wondering if there were any other mothers out there that agree.

Update:

Please remember that SIDS and suffocation are two different things. SIDS is unexplainable and will happen no matter how the baby is sleeping (back, belly, side,in the pack n play, in the crib, car seat...)and suffocation is preventable.

Update 2:

one more note: thank you for y'all responses, but I asked who agreed, not who disagreed. I know there is going to be 100 disagrees for every 1 agree. I really would like to hear from the women who agree, particularly the women who have newborn belly sleepers. I'd like to hear their advice and their worries and fears as well. I know this is highly controversial and that is why I asked who agrees with me, so I can read and find support.

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    Well, you are certainly free to make the choice for yourself, and it sounds like you've done a good bit of research. Be aware, though, that babies do sleep more deeply on their bellies, and this is one of the reasons that SIDS is more common in babies that sleep on their tummies. SIDS only occurs in babies that fall into the deepest stages of sleep, and back sleeping prevents this.

    Once baby learns to roll, however, you won't be able to stop him/her from ending up on their tummy if they roll in the night, and sleep positioners become a hazard once they start rolling around. After a certain point, there's only so much you can do to prevent them from rolling.

    One of the best things you can do to prevent SIDS is keep fluffy pillows, blankets, and stuffed animals out of their crib and keep cigarette smoke out of your home.

    Bottom line, it's your decision - just make sure you get all the research from both sides of the coin.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Uh, I got with the baby's flow, my oldest daughter was an excellent sleeper on her back. My youngest daughter was horrible, up every 15-30 minutes and both of us were miserable all the time. So I put her on her belly and that's how she always sleeps now, 9 months later. She was happier there. Now, I didn't follow the "guidelines" you just laid out. Which are great ideas to make it safer. But yeah, I was told that babies are comfortable on firm surfaces and with a blanket sleeper and and no blankets! Ha! Have you met my daughter, yeah, she slept on a comforter on her belly with a blanket over her. If not again, miserable for the both us. We also had the AngelCare motion detector, which helped me not be paranoid about it, but yeah it was an accident waiting to happen.

    But I agree, i see no problem with and the best way to do it, is to eliminate as many of the risks as possible.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I see where you are coming from. And I somewhat agree. However, I just don't take the chance at night. I put my 3 month old on her belly sometimes during the day if she is taking a nap near me (in her moses basket or in the pack and play in the den) where I will be able to check on her every few minutes.

    My husband's cousin lost her baby to SIDS when her baby was 6 months old. I don't know if they had a soft mattress, or blankets etc. But I would be too scared to try it over night.Not the risk that I want to take.

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  • 1 decade ago

    If you feel that you've done enough research and made an informed decision, then put her on her belly if you deem it appropriate. I assume that until she's old enough to be rolling around, she'll likely be sleeping in the same room as you anyway, so you'll be able to keep an eye on her regardless. I always put my daughter to sleep on her back, but I won't condemn you for your decision. The opinions in the medical community change so often that it's difficult to know what we should definitely be doing.

    The way I see it, whether you put a baby on his/her back or stomach, there are different suffocation dangers both ways.

    That being said, I think you should keep in mind that your daughter might not like being on her belly, just as some babies don't like sleeping on their backs. My daughter starts out on her back and goes to her side after a couple minutes, but I don't worry about it as much as I did when she was younger since I know she can correct herself if she ends up in a weird/dangerous position.

    Source(s): Mom to 13-month old
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  • I have an 8 week old son who sleeps so much better on his belly. We did our research too - firm mattress and a ceiling fan. Even with these, I get nervous letting him sleep on his belly because of the "back is best" that is pounded into our heads. So, we let him nap in his belly (and just started that last week) and at night he is on his back. As soon as he can roll over, then he can sleep whichever way he prefers - I'm not getting up all night to roll him back over.

    To help with the back sleeping, we swaddle him. He doesn't startle himself that way.

    Kudos on all of your research!!

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, I don't agree. Just because you think you can "fix" the two main risks of SIDS, why would you plan on having your baby sleep on her belly when you yourself say that all the research says otherwise?

    It's like saying, I'm planning on not putting my newborn in a car seat when we're driving, because I'm planning on being a very safe driver. Why not just do what's recommended?

    We all were belly sleepers as babies, because that was the recommendation then. And a lot more babies died back then! Most babies sleep fine on their back. So why tempt fate?

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    If you want to put your baby to sleep in 20 seconds you must get the "Instant Baby Sleep" MP3 sound track. Here is their official web-site: http://www.instantbabysleep.net

    The sound track gently produces energy over the full human hearing spectrum with an embedded pulse that gently eases the brain to the Alpha state well known for drowsiness and sleep induction.

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  • 1 decade ago

    As a mom you have to do what you feel best for your baby.

    The "safest" way for a baby to sleep is changing all the time. Who knows what is best. Only you know what is best for your baby. My baby was in the NICU for two months where he spent most of his time on his tummy do to medical reasons. By the time I got to take him home he was used to sleeping on his tummy and I could not get him to sleep on his back. So I had to choices - let him sleep how he could or have him cry all night and never sleep. Never sleeping would not have been a good choice for either of us.

    You are the mom and you know what is best for your baby

    Source(s): Mother of four
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  • ..
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    I disagree, and my son is a back sleeper.

    However, I respect that it is your decision, you've done alot of research and you obviously feel you are doing whats right for your child.

    Every family is different, what is right for one is not right for the other.

    Congratulations on finding what is right for you dispite what the rest of the world may think.

    *edit*

    I too did alot of research when I decided on back-sleeping. Many people thought it was ridiculous to research and that I should just blindly do whatever the pediatrician told me to do. I've never been the type to blindly follow anyone, no matter how educated they are.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I see youve done your reasearch, but I dont see why you would take a chance, it has been more then proven that sleeping on the back reduces SIDS. You can put the baby on her tummy when you are right there to watch her. I just wouldnt take the chance.

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