Why is it still politically correct to adhere to the one drop rule?

Tiger Woods is 25% Black, 50% Asian, 12.5% Native American, and 12.5% White yet he is labeled black. I understand the history of the "one drop rule" during slavery and the century following it. My question is why is it still politically correct among the media and politicians to refer to the likes of Tiger Woods and Barrack Obama as black? It doesn't make any sense. Will Tiger Woods's kids also be referred to as black when they'll have only 12.5% African ancestry? Does the fact that they "look" black (Woods looks as Asian as he does Black) make it politically correct when Woods has even said that he doesn't consider himself black?

Update:

Obviously no one is purely white or black and the definitions of white and black (and Asian for that matter) are a bit murky. It would be simpler to just stop labeling people as such and instead just refer to them by name.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    That's a very good question. I am also mixed but appear white so I am one of those people whom others think is crazy when I say I am mixed or black (even though I was raised that way just after the one-drop rule stopped being used). I find the double standard infuriating. I also find it infuriating that, unlike Tiger, both of my parents consider themselves black but MY racial identity and culture is summarily dismissed because I don't "look black" to people. Unlike the way things used to be, people now judge race by the way you look whether you want them to or not. This is still very racist as far as I am concerned.

    Until we are accepted as who we are, Tiger will have to keep telling people he's mixed and so will I. "Mixed" just hasn't hit the tipping point yet but one day it will.

    EDIT: At the same time, I believe that President Obama is just as entitled to his racial identity as I, Tiger, and myself are. But catergorizing people just based on the way they look and not allowing them to explain their own identities is flat out wrong.

  • 4 years ago

    Because it's a social concept that defined what it meant to be African American. If a person is biracial, in this day and age, and they claim to be mixed I'm fine with it. They are biracial so I have no problem with that; however, what i do have a problem with is other people claiming that a biracial who considers themselves black, isn't black. And the thing I have the biggest problem with, is people claiming that certain black celebrities are not black because they have a non-white ancestor somewhere down the line. Almost all African Americans have that. Barack Obama is 49 years old. The one drop rule was very much in effect when he was growing up. He was treated as a black man his entire life - even in liberal Hawaii! Now that he's an accomplished man, and POTUS, people claim he isn't black. If he was Barack the janitor, he'd be black; If he was Barack, prisoner number 213, he's be black. If he'd been a failure in life, no one would care that he was biracial. When people talk about the black prison statistics and blacks on welfare, they never separate the mixed people from the black people. Where do you think the biracial people are in those statistics? They're lumped in with black people. What I have a problem with is, biracial people are considered black when they're associated with negativity, but if they're admirable, the're not black. It seems, many people try to distance anything good from being black. But like I said, I don't have a problem with biracial people who consider themselves biracial - I have a problem with other people claiming they're biracial when the biracial individual claims black. edit - I just read what you wrote about being born in Latin America. The one drop rule doesn't apply to you. It's an exclusive to the US.

  • I think being PC is essentially generalizing in this case. The fact of the matter is identity is a very complex issue, but when it comes down to trying to categorize demographics or measure and record data, identity is automatically oversimplified. Consequently, in the cases of President Obama, Tiger Woods, Halle Berry, Soledad O'Brien, Rosario Dawson, Derek Jeter, Jimi Hendrix, Vin Diesel etc. hardly anyone pays attention to the fact that they are of mixed heritage.

    Honestly, I think the concept of anyone being "purely" anything as far as white or black goes is ridiculous regardless of how many drops or what percentage of each background you have. To be black in and of itself is to be mixed (albeit somewhere down the line in most cases). Most Africans or Americans of direct (traceable) African ancestry don't even identify themselves as black. Nor do most, Mediterranean (Italian, Greek); or Eurasian (Russian, Turkish) people identify as white. So, what do you do when you have to check a box, or when in many cases someone checks it for you? You pick whichever you identify the strongest with or fill in the "other" blank. Society doesn't really leave much room to claim it all, nor does it matter if when people look at you all they see is color.

  • 1 decade ago

    Many people who are even the slightest bit black and/or who look the slightest bit black seem to WANT to have solidarity with African Americans. The black genetics are so dominant, that it doesn't necessarily take a high % to "look" black. Until it becomes en vogue to be "mixed race," I think Tiger Woods will continue to be referred to as black, despite how he considers himself.

    I am somewhat surprised myself that using the term "black" for someone of mixed heritage is still so widely used, given that Mr. Obama is now president of the USA. Perhaps this will change, but frankly I don't really think it's necessary. People will identify themselves as they see fit, and people will identify others as they see fit. Plus, let's not forget, identifying someone by how they look saves time: "See that man of Asian-Caucasian-Native American-Africain American descent yonder? I like his hat." I can't imagine anyone choosing to use this over "I like that black guy's hat."

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  • Funnel
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    PC is a joke. It all depends on which is the most popular. Do you think the anointed one would have been elected if the Liberal media had highlighted his White or Arab ethnicity? Bama is only 6% Black but he looks Black and these times dictate that as widely popular so Liberals and terrorists find one of their own who looks Black and promotes their agenda and viola, koolaid drinkers incredibly fall for it again. Now here we sit on the brink of disaster and the verge loosing freedom as we know it because instead of seeing Obama for what he really is and paying attention to what he does instead of what he says, the goofy Libs and Dems voted and support him still for fear of being labeled as Racist. If you think they dont play that up to keep control then you're just another blind koolaid drinker. None so blind as those who wont see.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's rather hard to figure out what's politically correct because it changes daily.

    The whole idea of being politically correct was meant to keep from offending people. Everyone will refer to people as they see them (which is different for everyone), and that's all there is to it.

    EDIT: If anyone was really working off of the One Drop Rule, it could be argued that there were several Black presidents of the U.S. before Obama.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think the press is interpreting things *in terms of* the existing one drop rule. For them, it's not a question of who you are, but of how society treats you. Both Woods and Obama broke major racial barriers and that was a consequence of their black blood, not their white or in Woods's case Asian. So for the press, that's where the story is.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I think it's based on looks. When Tiger Woods or Barack Obama gets pulled over by the police, they get treated like a black man. Well, before they were famous at least.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    trust me. they can name all their extensive lineage they want and when it's all said and done, the government still marks them black in the system

    im african american, caucasian, cherokee indian etc myself but it doesn't matter. no one wants to see a hundred boxes checked on those official forms, right? just pick one!

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I don’t think it has anything to do with being PC. It just makes the person in question look really crazy to claim what s/he by all appearances doesn’t look like.

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