Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelAfrica & Middle EastIsrael · 1 decade ago

why israel was called palestine by romans?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    In the 2nd century CE, the last attempt of the Jews to achieve independence from the Roman Empire ended with the well-known event of Masada, which is historically documented and universally recognized as the fact that determined the Jewish Diaspora in a definitive way.

    The land where these things happened was the province known as Judea, and there is no mention of any place called "Palestine" before that time.

    The Roman emperor Hadrian was utterly upset with the Jewish Nation and wanted to erase the name of Israel and Judah from the face of the Earth, so that there would be no memory of the country that belonged to that rebel people. He decided to replace the denomination of that Roman province and resorted to ancient history in order to find a name that might appear appropriate, and found that an extinct people that was unknown in Roman times, called "Philistines," was once dwelling in that area and were enemies of the Israelites.

    Therefore, according to Latin spelling, he invented the new name: "Palestina," a name that would be also hateful for the Jews as it reminded them their old foes. He did so with the explicit purpose of effacing any trace of Jewish history. Ancient Romans, as well as modern Palestinians, have fulfilled the Hebrew Scriptures Prophecy that declares: "They lay crafty plans against Your People... they say: come, let us wipe them out as a nation; let the name of Israel be remembered no more'." - Tehillim 83:3-4 (Psalm 83:3-4).

    They failed, and Israel is still alive. Any honest person would recognize that there is no mention of the name Palestine in history before the Romans renamed the province of Judea, that such name does not occur in any ancient document, is not written in the Bible, neither in the Hebrew Scriptures nor in the Christian Testament, not even in Assyrian, Persian, Macedonian, Ptolemaic, Seleucian or other Greek sources, and that not any "Palestinian" people has ever been mentioned, not even by the Romans that invented the term. If "Palestinians" allegedly are the historic inhabitants of the Holy Land, why did they not fight for independence from Roman occupation as Jews did? How is it possible that not a single Palestinian leader heading for a revolt against the Roman invaders is mentioned in any historic record? Why there is not any Palestinian rebel group mentioned, as for example the Jewish Zealots? Why every historic document mentions the Jews as the native inhabitants, and the Greeks, Romans and others as foreigners dwelling in Judea, but not any Palestinian people, neither as native nor as foreigner? What is more, there is no reference to any Palestinian people in the Qur'an (Quran), although Muslims claim that their prophet was once in Jerusalem (an event that is not mentioned in the Quran either). It appears evident that he did not meet any Palestinian in his whole life, nor his successors did either.

    Caliph Salahuddin al-Ayyub (Saladin), knew the Jews and kindly invited them to settle in Jerusalem, that he recognized as their Homeland, but he did not know any Palestinian.

    To claim that Palestinians are the original people of Eretz Yisrael (the Land of Israel) is not only against secular history but also against Islamic history!

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    • Kaza3 years agoReport

      that is actually not true, the land was named Philistia by the Greeks which is the Greek name for Palestine, in fact there is no historical evidence of a land called Israel or Judea until 1949, the Romans did not conquer Judea, they conquered the Seleucid empire..

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  • 3 years ago

    Roman Palestine

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    why israel was called palestine by romans?

    Source(s): israel called palestine romans: https://tr.im/V9u9W
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  • dandyl
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The term "Palestine" is believed to be derived from the Philistines, an Aegean people who, in the 12th Century B.C.E., settled along the Mediterranean coastal plain of what are now Israel and the Gaza Strip. In the second century C.E., after crushing the last Jewish revolt, the Romans first applied the name Palaestina to Judea (the southern portion of what is now called the West Bank) in an attempt to minimize Jewish identification with the land of Israel. The Arabic word "Filastin" is derived from this Latin nameThe Hebrews entered the Land of Israel about 1300 B.C.E., living under a tribal confederation until being united under the first monarch, King Saul. The second king, David, established Jerusalem as the capital around 1000 B.C.E. David's son, Solomon built the Temple soon thereafter and consolidated the military, administrative and religious functions of the kingdom. The nation was divided under Solomon's son, with the northern kingdom (Israel) lasting until 722 B.C.E., when the Assyrians destroyed it, and the southern kingdom (Judah) surviving until the Babylonian conquest in 586 B.C.E. The Jewish people enjoyed brief periods of sovereignty afterward before most Jews were finally driven from their homeland in 135 C.E.

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  • 1 decade ago

    "Palestine has always constituted a single geographical, political and demographic unit with Greater Syria and Egypt. On its soil the civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt intermingled. Palestine also witnessed, as a land bridge linking Asia, Africa, and Europe, several movements and waves of conquerors who dominated it for different periods of time and left behind varying degrees of influence."

    - By Abdul Jawad Saleh, in Transformation of Palestine, printed in Challenge, February 1995, published on the WWW by the Center for Research and Documentation of Palestinian Society, Bir Zeit University, the Land of Israel.

    The Romans had changed the name of the Land of Israel to "Palestine." But from AD 640 until the 1960s, Arabs referred to this same Land as "Southern Syria." Arabs only started calling the Land "Palestine" in the 1960s. Until about the eighteenth century, the Christian world called this same Land, "The Holy Land." Thereafter, they used two names: "The Holy Land" and "Palestine." When the League of Nations in 1922 gave Great Britain the mandate to prepare Palestine as a national home for the Jewish people, the official name of the Land became "Palestine" and remained so until the rebirth of the Israeli State in 1948. During this very period, the leaders of the Arabs in the Land, however, called themselves Southern Syrians and clamored that the Land become a part of a "Greater Syria." This "Arab Nation" would include Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Transjordan as well as Palestine. An observation in TIME magazine well articulated how the Palestinian identity was born so belatedly in the 1960s.

    Golda Meir once argued that there was no such thing as a Palestinian; at the time, she wasn't entirely wrong. Before Arafat began his proselytizing, most of the Arabs from the territory of Palestine thought of themselves as members of an all-embracing Arab nation.

    It was the arch-terrorist Arafat who made the absurd intellectual leap to a definition of the Palestinians as a distinct people; he articulated the cause, organized for it, fought for it and brought it to the world's attention. And then, with his embezzled billions of dollars, he died of AIDS.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The Plishtim (Philistines) have nothing to do with any Arabs, and certainly not those living in or near Israel.

    There has never been a nation called "Palestine," ever. The name came into existence from Romans, who after finally defeating the Jews after 300 years of wars, sought to insult them. The name means, "land of the Philistines." Those familiar with the bible will recall that Jews and Philistines hated each other.

    They hated each other so much that the Jews finally made them extinct. By 600 BC, all of them were dead.

    Who were they? Could today’s "Palestinians" possible be their descendants? The Philistines were Greek; they came from the island of Crete, near Greece. I do not think you will ever find a single "Palestinians" agreeing that those were their ancestors.

    Indeed, no Arab nation has ever stood on that land. Arabs invaded under omar in the seventh century, but ruled it as part of a large empire, and even then only for 22 years. 'Omar did not allow his soldiers to marry local women, and so until the 9th century Jews continued as the overall majority on the land.

    Only under Salah a Din did the Jews fall into a minority (after crusaders had ravaged the land first), and Salah a Din was not even Arab, but a Kurd!

    People that say it is an "Arab land" are ignorant of history, of truth.

    Most of the people now calling themselves "Palestinians" are descended from Arabs who migrated there from the 18th century, onward until the present. They did so when the Ottomans, who were Turks, not Arabs, ruled the land; it has never been an "Arab land."

    • Nina V6 years agoReport

      Abraham and Lot, the fathers of Israel, came from Ur. This is located in Africa . Passed Egypt ,enslaved, and their God told them " kill every man , child, woman that opposes you" like the Canaanites and many other tribes. Titus gave the name of Palestine when he destroyed Israel in 71 AC.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Because before 1948 there was no state called Israel.

    • before 1948 there was a land called israel. the romans changed it to palestine to try to erase the memory of israel after they had enough of the jews fighting them for control

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  • 1 decade ago

    The name is derived from Philistines, the people who lived their prior to the Israelite capture. The Romans called Israel Palestine to remove Jewish attachment to the land.

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  • 1 decade ago

    As an insult to the Jews. It's still happening.

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  • 1 decade ago

    OK, OK, I know this.

    Two possible official answers here:

    One. That's the true name of Palestine.

    Two. The Italians got fed up with the jews and decided to go anti-S just to piss them off.

    And now mine:

    Some scholars I met in the pub, told me that "Israel" actually means "people with huge snorkels" ...Is ...ra......el.

    See?

    Take your pick, but I think I prefer Palestine. It sounds sweeter and more peaceful.

    Shoot!

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  • 1 decade ago

    Here are some relevant quotations:

    "The fact is that today's Palestinians are immigrants from the surrounding nations! I grew up well knowing the history and origins of today's Palestinians as being from Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Christians from Greece, Muslim Sherkas from Russia, Muslims from Bosnia, and the Jordanians next door. The civil and tribal wars between Yemenites (from Yemen) and Kessites (from Banu Kais of Saudi Arabia) ... are well known among Palestinians.

    "My grandfather, who was a dignitary in Bethlehem, almost lost his life by Abdul Qader Al-Husseni (the leader of the Palestinian revolution) after being accused of selling land to Jews. He used to tell us that his village Beit Sahur (The Shepherds Fields) in Bethlehem County was empty before his father settled in the area with six other families. The town has now grown to 30,000 inhabitants."

    - Walid, a Palestinian Arab defector, talking about the recent immigration of Arabs to Palestine. quoted from "Answering Islam"

    On August 11, 1919 in a memorandum to Lord Curzon, Lord Balfour stated that "whatever be the future of Palestine, it is not now an 'independent nation,' nor is it yet on the way to becoming one." Professor of history Reverend James Parkes wrote in Whose Land that "before 1914, ... the mass of the population [in Palestine] had no real feeling of belonging to any wider unit than their village, clan or possibly confederation of clans." He stressed the point that "up to that time it is not possible to speak of the existence of any general sentiment of nationality."

    A Palestinian Arab, Professor of history Rashid Khalidi recently confirmed Balfour's and Parkes' statements that the population of Palestine at the beginning of this century did not represent a distinct nation. In his book Palestinian Identity, he wrote that only at the beginning of the twentieth century did the Arabs of Palestine start to see "themselves as part of other communities, both larger and smaller ones. This identification certainly did not include all sectors or classes of the population. But it did constitute a new and powerful category of identity that was simply nonexistent a generation or two before, and was still novel and limited in its diffusion before World War I."

    ...the non-Jewish residents of Palestine tried to don several different identities. First, they attempted to become Ottomans. This attempt failed after the defeat of the Ottoman army and subsequent withdrawal of Ottoman authority from Palestine. As Khalidi wrote, "in a period of a few years, Ottomanism as an ideology went from being one of the primary sources of identification for Palestinians, to having no apparent impact at all." Then came the turn of the Syrian identity that did not last long either. When the French crushed the two-year-old independent Syrian state in 1920, the elite of the Palestinian Arabs decided to change orientation again. Khalidi quotes the nationalist leader Musa Kazim Pasa al-Husayni, who said, "Now, after the recent events in Damascus, we have to effect a complete change in our plans here. Southern Syria no longer exists. We must defend Palestine."

    It is important to note that the nationalist movement among the non-Jewish residents of Palestine did not originate on its soil, but was imported from Egypt, Turkey and France. Parkes wrote that it was "exclusively political in the narrowest sense, and showed little awareness of the day-to-day problems which would arise if its political objective were reached." Illiterate fellahin became the pawns in the game of power-thirsty Arab nationalists who tried to repeat King Abdulla's success in Jordan at a smaller scale in the remaining part of Palestine.

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