curious asked in Consumer ElectronicsTVs · 1 decade ago

what is the difference between LCD TV and Plasma TV?

what is the difference in the quality of picture in LCD Tv and Plasma TV and how do they work? Which is better?

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  • 1 decade ago
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    Outward appearances are definitely deceiving when it comes to LCD and Plasma televisions. Although both types of televisions are flat and thin, they employ different technology in an attempt to deliver similar results

    Plasma television technology is based loosely on the fluorescent light bulb. The display itself consists of cells. Within each cell two glass panels are separated by a narrow gap in which neon-xenon gas is injected and sealed in plasma form during the manufacturing process. The gas is electrically charged at specific intervals when the Plasma set is in use. The charged gas then strikes red, green, and blue phosphors, thus creating a television image. Each group of red, green, and blue phosphors is called a pixel (picture element).

    Although Plasma television technology eliminate the need for the bulky picture tube and electron beam scanning of traditional televisions, because it still employs the burning of phosphors to generate an image, Plasma televisions still suffer from some of the drawbacks of traditional televisions, such as heat generation and screen-burn of static images

    LCD televisions, on the other hand, use a different technology (see also question #1 for this same explanation).

    Basically, LCD panels are made of two layers of transparent material, which are polarized, and are "glued" together. One of the layers is coated with a special polymer that holds the individual liquid crystals. Current is then passed through individual crystals, which allow the crystals to pass or block light to create images. LCD crystals do not produce their own light, so an external light source, such as florescent bulb is needed for the image created by the LCD to become visible to the viewer.

    Unlike standard CRT and Plasma televisions, since there are no phosphors that light up, less power is needed for operation and the light source in an LCD television generates less heat than a Plasma or traditional television. Also, because of the nature of LCD technology, there is no radiation emitted from the screen itself.

    The ADVANTAGES of Plasma over LCD are:

    1. Larger screen size availability.

    2. Better contrast ratio and ability to render deeper blacks.

    3. Better color accuracy and saturation.

    4. Better motion tracking (little or no motion lag in fast moving images).

    The DISADVANTAGES of Plasma vs LCD include:

    1. Plasma TVs are more susceptible to burn-in of static images.

    2. Plasma TVs generate more heat than LCDs, due to the need to light of phosphors to create the images.

    3. Does not perform as well at higher altitudes.

    4. Potentially shorter display life span - this used to be the case. Early Plasmas had 30,000 hours or 8 hrs of viewing a day for 9 years, which was less than LCD. However, screen life span has now improved and 60,000 hour life span rating are now common, with some sets rated as high as 100,000 hours, due to technology improvements.

    LCD television ADVANTAGES over Plasma include:

    1. No burn-in of static images.

    2. Cooler running temperature.

    3. No high altitude use issues.

    4. Increased image brightness over Plasma.

    5. Lighter weight (when comparing same screen sizes) than Plasma counterparts.

    6. Longer display life used to be a factor, but now LCD and Plasma sets both have at least 60,000 hour or higher lifespans.

    DISADVANTAGES of LCD vs Plasma televisions include:

    1. Lower contrast ratio, not as good rendering deep blacks.

    2. Not as good at tracking motion (fast moving objects may exhibit lag artifacts) - However, this is improving with the recent implementation of 120Hz screen refresh rates and 240Hz processing in higher-end LCD sets.

    3. Not as common in large screen sizes above 42-inches as Plasma. However, the number is growing fast, with 46 and 47-inch screen sizes becoming more common, and some LCD sets having a screen size as large as 65-inches also available to the general public.

    4. Although LCD televisions do not suffer from burn-in susceptibility, it is possible that individual pixels on an LCD televisions can burn out, causing small, visible, black or white dots to appear on the screen. Individual pixels cannot be repaired, the whole screen would need to be replaced at that point, if the individual pixel burnout becomes annoying to you.

    5. LCD televisions are typically more expensive than equivalent-sized Plasma televisions (although this is changing), especially when comparing EDTV Plasmas to HDTV-LCD televisions

    LCD Television Advantages

    LCD television advantages include no burn-in susceptibility, cooler running, less screen glare, more functional at high altitudes, longer display life (although improvements are being made in Plasma screen life), looks better in brightly lit rooms, and less power consumption than Plasma.

    Also, LCD televisions have made great strides in upping-the-ante in native pixel resolution, with a growing number of sets offering a full 1

  • 4 years ago

    Lets not get to technical or be one sided on the subject. Both types (LCD and Plasma) will have a great picture quality. Lets break this into simple categories. (They are very different technologies.) Power Usage (energy consumption): LCD uses a constant power output and is rated lower than a Plasma. However, Plasma technology does not have a constant power output. The rating on a plasma is if you ran the TV with a white screen all day. You would actually save power using a Plasma at the end of the day. (for about the same time of usage, a Plasma will use about 2/3 as much power but really only equates to a few dollars extra a month on your bill) Picture Quality: Plasma is a different technology that allows for less motion blur and darker black levels. This means you will see a better picture overall. The downside that Plasma has is that it will usually have a reflection but they use a special type of screen to minimize this. Sound Quality: Typically, televisions are not designed to have great sound. This should not be a factor when buying your TV. Price: Plasma over the years have come down in price a lot and they can be found to be cheaper than LCD televisions. You should always shop around for a good deal and compare yourself. Weight: Plasma televisions are really heavy compared to a LCD television. This is because the front screen is glass on a plasma and the LCD has a more fragile front screen. Screen Burn In: LCD does not suffer from this symptom very much. Plasma is typically a temporary problem and is really only a concern early in its usage (first 100 hours). At least Panasonic Plasmas have built in features to minimize this and a wiper (scrolling white bar) that is used to erase these problems. Life Span: LCD and Plasma both have the same probability of breaking. Newer Plasma televisions however have a longer half life (about 100,000) hours. Half life is how much usage the TV has to go through to have HALF the brightness of the TV compared to when you purchased it. Personally, I prefer Plasma televisions but both will give you a great picture and you will not regret spending the money. You should have enough info here to help decide. Happy shopping.

  • jf
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    First and foremost TV size matters. Consider Plasma a "high end tech spec." Such tech specs don't really come into play unless you break 40" and moreso 50". In TVs of 37" and smaller you just aren't going to see the advantages of those features, so its not worth the money paying for them. Hence why you don't see any of the major brands releasing small sized Plasma sets.

    Other tech features that fall into that category are 1080p (vs 720p), 120Hz/240Hz refresh rate (vs 60Hz), and LED backlit LCD (vs CCFL). All of these require you pay a price premium for them. And you're not really going to get much from them unless you're looking at bigger sets. In a 37" or smaller set a 720p 60Hz CCFL LCD will do you just fine.

    All LCDs (even LED LCDs) suffer from motion blur (ghost trails) when playing back fast motion. This is why you have the 120Hz and 240Hz refresh rates. These are meant to help compensate. They do help a lot for sure, but they aren't 100%. And you have to pay a very steep price premium for this feature.

    CCFL (traditional) LCDs will have weak color, less true blacks, and reduced contrast. LCD manufacturers compensate for this with the advent of the LED LCD. This helps tremendously. The LED LCD image is far superior. But again you pay a massive price premium to get such a set.

    Plasma, inherently out of the box, has a near instantaneous refresh rate (like a CRT). That means it can play back fast motion flawlessly (the 480Hz or 600Hz things you see on Plasma are more marketing than anything else, just know they rock on fast motion).

    Plasma will deliver, out of the box, better color, truer blacks, and deeper contrast. Its just inherent to the technology. There is no price premium for the superior image. Right now its still even stronger than an LED LCD in these regards (and WAY cheaper).

    Plasma's are glossy screens (because they are glass), and LCDs are typically matte finishes. So if your room has a large amount of uncontrollable light bleeding in, sometimes an LCD can be the better choice. But Plasmas now have better anti-reflection coatings, and well if the light is too bad, even the LCD's matte finish might not be enough (you might have to find ways to block the light).

    Plasmas mainly only suffer from myths and misconceptions based upon their problematic early days. They used to be more expensive, suffer from burn-in, not work in high altitudes, have short life-spans, and be energy hogs. This is not the case anymore though.

    In the larger sizes they are often cheaper (Because of the price premium on 120Hz and LED). They no longer suffer from burn-in, and major brands even include anti-image retention features (above and beyond the technology advancements). The better models are rated at 100,000 hours which is equal to or better than any LCD. And modern ones are now energy star rated.

    If you go with a Plasma, I recommend going with a Panasonic Viera. They are the leaders in the technology (now that Pioneer has decided to leave the game). They have very good pricing (and do go on sale at like Best Buy and such). If Panasonic just isn't for you, then you can settle with either a Samsung or LG Plasma.

    If you do go LCD, in smaller sizes, I prefer Panasonic again. This is purely for aesthetics. I prefer the blacks and colors they deliver over other brands. Otherwise, or if you go into bigger sizes, look to the big 3 S's.... Sony, Samsung, and Sharp Aquos are all your friend there. LG and Toshiba make some good models too, so are worth your consideration as well.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Which is better is really up for debate, but there are a few general things you can say about them.

    Generally, if the TV is going to be in a bright room an LCD would be best, and a plasma would be better for a dark room. LCDs tend to have brighter images, while plasmas have deeper and more realistic blacks. I would recommend simply googling LCD vs plasma.

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  • 1 decade ago

    First off the quality of picture I'd say the LCD is better..next the LCD is powered by a number of micrscopic mirrors and the plasma uses lasers (causing overhears a lot). The LCD is much more reliable and can give you at least 5 more years then a plasma.along with a picture advantage.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Outward appearances are definitely deceiving when it comes to LCD and Plasma televisions. Although both types of televisions are flat and thin, they employ different technology in an attempt to deliver similar results.

    Plasma TV Overview

    Plasma television technology is based loosely on the fluorescent light bulb. The display itself consists of cells. Within each cell two glass panels are separated by a narrow gap in which neon-xenon gas is injected and sealed in plasma form during the manufacturing process. The gas is electrically charged at specific intervals when the Plasma set is in use. The charged gas then strikes red, green, and blue phosphors, thus creating a television image. Each group of red, green, and blue phosphors is called a pixel (picture element).

    Although Plasma television technology eliminate the need for the bulky picture tube and electron beam scanning of traditional televisions, because it still employs the burning of phosphors to generate an image, Plasma televisions still suffer from some of the drawbacks of traditional televisions, such as heat generation and screen-burn of static images.

    LCD TV Overview

    LCD televisions, on the other hand, use a different technology (see also question #1 for this same explanation).

    Basically, LCD panels are made of two layers of transparent material, which are polarized, and are "glued" together. One of the layers is coated with a special polymer that holds the individual liquid crystals. Current is then passed through individual crystals, which allow the crystals to pass or block light to create images. LCD crystals do not produce their own light, so an external light source, such as florescent bulb is needed for the image created by the LCD to become visible to the viewer.

    Unlike standard CRT and Plasma televisions, since there are no phosphors that light up, less power is needed for operation and the light source in an LCD television generates less heat than a Plasma or traditional television. Also, because of the nature of LCD technology, there is no radiation emitted from the screen itself.

    Plasma vs LCD

    The ADVANTAGES of Plasma over LCD are:

    1. Larger screen size availability.

    2. Better contrast ratio and ability to render deeper blacks.

    3. Better color accuracy and saturation.

    4. Better motion tracking (little or no motion lag in fast moving images).

    The DISADVANTAGES of Plasma vs LCD include:

    1. Plasma TVs are more susceptible to burn-in of static images.

    2. Plasma TVs generate more heat than LCDs, due to the need to light of phosphors to create the images.

    3. Does not perform as well at higher altitudes.

    4. Potentially shorter display life span - this used to be the case. Early Plasmas had 30,000 hours or 8 hrs of viewing a day for 9 years, which was less than LCD. However, screen life span has now improved and 60,000 hour life span rating are now common, with some sets rated as high as 100,000 hours, due to technology improvements.

    LCD television ADVANTAGES over Plasma include:

    1. No burn-in of static images.

    2. Cooler running temperature.

    3. No high altitude use issues.

    4. Increased image brightness over Plasma.

    5. Lighter weight (when comparing same screen sizes) than Plasma counterparts.

    6. Longer display life used to be a factor, but now LCD and Plasma sets both have at least 60,000 hour or higher lifespans.

    DISADVANTAGES of LCD vs Plasma televisions include:

    1. Lower contrast ratio, not as good rendering deep blacks.

    2. Not as good at tracking motion (fast moving objects may exhibit lag artifacts) - However, this is improving with the recent implementation of 120Hz screen refresh rates and 240Hz processing in higher-end LCD sets.

    3. Not as common in large screen sizes above 42-inches as Plasma. However, the number is growing fast, with 46 and 47-inch screen sizes becoming more common, and some LCD sets having a screen size as large as 65-inches also available to the general public.

    4. Although LCD televisions do not suffer from burn-in susceptibility, it is possible that individual pixels on an LCD televisions can burn out, causing small, visible, black or white dots to appear on the screen. Individual pixels cannot be repaired, the whole screen would need to be replaced at that point, if the individual pixel burnout becomes annoying to you.

    5. LCD televisions are typically more expensive than equivalent-sized Plasma televisions (although this is changing), especially when comparing EDTV Plasmas to HDTV-LCD Televisions.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Plasmas get too much reflection.

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