Fatty liver disease question?

My husband was diagnosed with a fatty liver a few months ago. He has been struggling with alcoholism as well. He doesn't really drink on the week days anymore but pretty much drinks a ton on the weekend. He is giving AA a try! So hopefully it can help. Not only does he have a fatty liver he also has high cholesterol and his doc is treating him with Zocor. I have read that people who have liver probs should not take Zocor. The doc said he has to treat him for the high cholesterol no matter what. I'm wondering if this is going to make his liver even worse. Although he has the desire to quit drinking for his health and his family is this med going to make his liver worse and should I get a second opinion? Not to mention he is only 27. Thank you!!!

Update:

Far from obese! He is 5'6 185. He may be a tad over weight but not obese.

21 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    The fat developing inside the liver causes more pressure

    in the liver because the liver is surrounded by a membrane

    capsule. The fat can even push the nucleus of the cells

    out of position. If the cells become damaged by this,

    the immune system of the body will respond to this

    and cause inflammation to develop in the liver and

    the liver will enlarge in size. More added pressure.

    This should be taken very seriously. All liver patients

    are told "no alcohol"...if a patient needs help coming

    off the alcohol, he can be put into a detox program

    at the hospital or he can ask the doctor for medication

    to help with the side effects of coming off the alcohol.

    Alcohol is the number one reason for a liver problem,

    especially a fatty liver problem. The doctor should

    know he is drinking....even though he can find this

    out through testing he takes.

    Alcohol isn't the only thing that causes fatty liver disease:

    hereditary conditions, high cholesterol and triglycerides,

    diabetes, insulin resistance, weight gain and other

    things can, also.

    Cholesterol is a lipid that is made by the body and is

    needed to help make the cell membranes...it is important

    in the body. Too much, though, and it can cause damage

    to the vessels and also become a cause of fat build

    up in the liver. The doctor can try and place a patient

    on a low cholesterol diet. This works for some patients

    if< and only if, it isn't this way because of an inherited

    family history.

    Doctors have to weigh the pros and cons of all

    medications they give the patient. The doctor might

    not want to use the Zocor on your husband...but,

    this is sort of a situation of deciding if it would help

    more than it would injure the liver. He probably is

    having blood testing done often to see if his

    enzymes and function tests rise from taking it...if

    it does and it concerns the doctor, he may take

    him back off of it. This is a situation of trying to

    do the best you can to help and see what might happen.

    Your husband should be with a gastroenterologist or

    hepatologist now. He should try to quit drinking alcohol...

    all liver patients are told NO ALCOHOL. If he needs

    to be placed on the transplant list in the future, he will

    not be placed on that list until he has been off alcohol for

    a period of six months.

    If there is damage to the liver cells and the inflammation

    is not treated and the cause cannot be removed,

    then it can lead to a more serious condition where the

    liver cells start to die off and form scar tissue in

    the liver that blocks the flow of blood to other liver cells

    and also blocks the flow of blood through the liver

    on its way back to the heart. This is then known

    as Cirrhosis of the liver and the only cure is a liver

    transplant.

    The very best test to find out how the liver is doing, is

    a liver biopsy. Blood tests only give a hint that

    something is wrong. Film testing can show certain

    things, but seeing the actual liver cells can tell them

    so much more such as how far advanced he is in

    this disease, how much damage has been done, etc.

    I'm providing links to understanding cirrhosis of the

    liver caused by alcohol or fatty liver and other things; and also a couple on fatty liver disease.

    Nash is Non alcoholic cause of SteatoHepatitis

    Steato means fat, Hepat or Hepato means liver,

    and Itis means inflamation.

    There is also Alcoholic SteatoHepatitis.

    http://www.medicinenet.com/cirrhosis/article.htm

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cirrhosis/DS00373

    http://www.medicinenet.com/fatty_liver/article.htm

    http://www.aafp.org/afp/20060601/1961.html

    You can go to these sites just by clicking on the links.

    Hope this information has been of help to you.

    Source(s): caregiver to a liver transplant patient
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Fatty liver disease question?

    My husband was diagnosed with a fatty liver a few months ago. He has been struggling with alcoholism as well. He doesn&#39;t really drink on the week days anymore but pretty much drinks a ton on the weekend. He is giving AA a try! So hopefully it can help. Not only does he have a fatty liver he...

    Source(s): fatty liver disease question: https://tr.im/Kb4Pe
  • 1 decade ago

    Obviously the drinking had cause the high levels of fatty liver. This is only the build up of fat in liver cells, this fat can actually cause no damage by itself, but something more could be happening here, such as cirrhosis.

    Obviously his doctor is more worried that he will have a heart attack, which if he has high cholesterol, I would put him on Zocor too.

    Now it is advised to not take Zocor if you have Liver Disease, obviously fatty cells is not liver disease, and if his doctor thought it was a serious threat he would never have put him on it.,

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Have may ways to treat fatty liver by using medicine and natural ways with healthy diet and regular exercise

    he should Stop drinking alcohol

    Diet and nutrition so it's important to eat a balanced diet to help ensure you get all the nutrients you need.

    Avoiding salty foods and not adding salt to foods you eat can help reduce your risk of developing swelling in your legs, feet and abdomen (tummy) caused by a build-up of fluid.

    My friend got fatty liver when 32 year olds, he doesn't what is the main causes leading to his disease so he found a book and admit it, the book is not only provide causes but also the way how to treat ?so on . you can find it at: http://adola.net/go/fattyliver-bible/

    Have a good health!

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  • 1 decade ago

    I personally had extremely high liver ribbons, and after eliminating all the common problems (no drug or alcohol use, no hep or hiv, etc) they just determined that I had a fatty liver and I should loose weight. Loosing weight did not help much, but I changed my diet and now only eat foods that do not have High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) in them and try to stay away from refined starches (white bread etc...).

    Now after about 6 months, I have normal blood work and no pain from the area of my liver.

  • 1 decade ago

    my mom has fatty tissue around her liver. She had a surgery a few years back and developed the fatty tissue from eating out way too much she's also not obese. She also had developed a hernia her doctor didn't tell her to take anything all he said was to watch what she eats and only eat baked food and start eating healthy.

  • 3 years ago

    Also include 10 grams regarding fiber to satiate hunger longer which will help prevent bloating from constipation.

  • 3 years ago

    Label each with time in addition to calorie amounts to avoid eating everything all at one time.

  • 3 years ago

    Possess one or two alcohol drinks every day rather then much more

  • 3 years ago

    when you'll want any lovely, take in a fruits. or a piece of food

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