Does anybody know any good Japanese sandwich recipes?

I see a lot of Japanese sandwiches such as tuna or cucumber and I've heard they're really delicious.

If anyone could provide me any recipes, I would really appreciate it :)

Update:

I dont want a history of sandwiches and such.. I just want recipes please :x

5 Answers

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  • zeinab
    Lv 4
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Tonkatsu is breaded deep-fried pork. It's a popular dish in Japan. Tonkatsu sandwiches are called katsusand.

    Ingredients:

    * 8 slices white bread

    * 4 pieces tonkatsu

    * 4 cabbage leaves

    * *butter

    * *tonkatsu sauce or Worcester sauce

    Preparation:

    Make tonkatsu and set aside. Slice cabbage into thin strips. Spread softened butter on each slice of bread. Spread some cabbage on a slice of bread and put a tonkatsu on the top. Put some tonkatsu sauce or Worcester sauce over the tonkatsu. Place a slice of bread on the top. Make four sandwiches. Cut each sandwich in half.

    Teriyaki chicken sandwich is called teriyaki chicken burger in Japan and is a popular menu at fast food restaurants.

    Ingredients:

    * 2 chicken breasts

    * 4 leaves lettuce

    * 1/2 onion

    * 4 tbsps mayonnaise

    * 5 tbsp teriyaki sauce

    * 4 hamburger buns

    Preparation:

    Flatten chicken breasts and cut them in halves. Marinate chicken in teriyaki sauce for 15 minutes in the refrigerator. Wash and tear lettuce into small pieces. Slice onion into thin rounds. Grill chicken until well-cooked. Put a piece of chicken on the bottom half of a bun and spread some mayonnaise on the chicken. Place onion slices and lettuce over the chicken. Put the other half of the bun on the top.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Well, my sister and I eat this after school or when we are in a hurry 2 slices of bread 5 pieces small dried salami like 6 hot cheetos Put the five slices on, one on each corner, the fifth in the middle. Layer on your hot cheetos, top with other slice of bread and voila the two minute sandwhich

  • Teriyaki chicken sandwich

    Teriyaki chicken sandwich is called teriyaki chicken burger in Japan and is a popular menu at fast food restaurants.

    Ingredients:

    •2 chicken breasts

    •4 leaves lettuce

    •1/2 onion

    •4 tbsps mayonnaise

    •5 tbsp teriyaki sauce

    •4 hamburger buns

    Method

    1.Flatten chicken breasts and cut them in halves. Marinate chicken in teriyaki sauce for 15 minutes in the refrigerator. Wash and tear lettuce into small pieces. Slice onion into thin rounds. Grill chicken until well-cooked.

    2.Put a piece of chicken on the bottom half of a bun and spread some mayonnaise on the chicken. Place onion slices and lettuce over the chicken. Put the other half of the bun on the top.

    AND

    Tonkatsu sandwiches

    Tonkatsu is breaded deep-fried pork. It's a popular dish in Japan. Tonkatsu sandwiches are called katsusand.

    Pork Recipes

    Ingredients:

    •8 slices white bread

    •4 pieces tonkatsu

    •4 cabbage leaves

    •*butter

    •*tonkatsu sauce or Worcester sauce

    Method

    1.Make tonkatsu and set aside. Slice cabbage into thin strips. Spread softened butter on each slice of bread. Spread some cabbage on a slice of bread and put a tonkatsu on the top. Put some tonkatsu sauce or Worcester sauce over the tonkatsu. Place a slice of bread on the top. Make four sandwiches. Cut each sandwich in half.

    AND

    Yakisoba sandwish

    Yakisoba is delicious itself, but it can be a delicious sandwich filling. Yakisoba sandwish makes a good lunch and is good to put in a lunch

    Ingredients:

    •1 package pre-steamed chuka noodles (150g/package)

    •1 tsp vegetable oil

    •2 oz carrot, peeled and thinly sliced carrots

    •1/2 small green bell pepper, thinly sliced

    •1/4 small onion, thinly sliced

    •1 green head cabbage leaf, chopped

    •2-3 Tbsps yakisoba sauce, or 1 packages of yakisoba seasoning, or 2-3 Tbsps Worcestershire sauce

    •Beni-shoga (pickled red ginger) for garnish

    •Salt and pepper

    •4 to 6 hot dog buns, buttered

    Method

    Lightly loosen pre-steamed chuka noodles and set aside. Heat vegetable oil in a medium skillet on medium heat. Stir-fry carrot, onion, and green bell pepper until softened. Add cabbage in the skillet and stir-fry for a minute. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Add noodles in the skillet. Pour 1/6 cup of water over the noodles and cover the skillet. Turn down the heat to low and steam for a few minutes, or until the liquid is almost gone. Remove the lid and add yakisoba seasoning powder or sauce, stirring the noodles quickly. Divide yakisoba into 4 to 6 portions. Place yakisoba in buns and garnish with benishoga if it's available. To pack in a lunch box, let yakisoba sandwiches cool and wrap in plastic wrap.

    Source(s): ♥ from my country...Hokkaido, Japan
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    http://www.recipezworld.com/category/sandwich-rece...

    they have alot of Japanese recipes.

    hope you like that

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    The image most people have of Japanese food is sushi, a dish rarely prepared correctly in Japan and almost never overseas. Maybe they should try a spaghetti sandwich instead.

    Sandwiches do not immediately leap to mind as a typical Japanese food. For that matter, neither do hamburgers, spaghetti or curry, which a recent survey of Japanese grade school children found to be their favorite foods. Hamburgers, spaghetti and curry came in tied for first, while sushi trailed a distinct second. Japan probably has more McDonald's restaurants than any other place on earth, with the possible exception of the USA. Homespun imitations like Lotteria and the unappetizingly named Mos Burger dog their steps up and down the Japanese Islands. Other American fast-food chains such as Kentucky Fried Chicken are major presences in Japan. Indian and French restaurants are everywhere and lately there has been a wave of so-called "Mediterranean" restaurants putting tomato sauce on everything. And then there are the pan-ya.

    Down almost every shopping street in Japan is a pan-ya or bakery shop. The foreign influence is obvious even in their name. The Japanese word for bread, pan, is a loan word from Portuguese. In countries like the United States, fresh bread baked daily has long been a thing of the past. With the exception of a few pastry makers, bakeries have vanished from most American neighborhoods. The French still cling to their tradition of fresh bread daily, but this too is under assault from hyper-markets and discount bakeries. But in Japan, every morning thousands of bakers rise early to fire up their ovens and bake fresh bread. "I know a few Japanese bakeries that make better French bread than the finest bakeries in Paris," says Genvieve Matheson, a lecturer in Japanese at a French university. "It's amazing the dedication they show."

    The Yonekura brothers, who are in their late thirties, run a small bakery located on a side street near Waseda station in Tokyo. They are assisted by their mother at the counter and occasionally by their wives when it gets busy. From morning till night there is a steady stream of customers from the neighborhood, and at lunch the store is packed with customers from nearby offices and building sites.

    "I don't see what's so odd about spaghetti sandwiches," says Hachihiro, the older of the Yonekura brothers. "Japanese like them," he says, eyeing a pile of left-over spaghetti sandwiches from the lunch rush. "Well, at least, some Japanese like them."

    The Yonekura brothers have been up since dawn baking sandwiches and are now taking a break behind the counter. Most Japanese sandwiches are actually rolls or buns with the filling baked in them. As well as spaghetti sandwiches, they make corn sandwiches, mashed potato sandwiches, mashed potato and corn sandwiches — for the adventurous, perhaps — green salad sandwiches, curry sandwiches and anko sandwiches, which use sweetened bean paste. Lately they have also been experimenting very successfully with more Western types of sandwiches and in anticipation of the lunch rush, make piles of hamburgers, beef teriyaki sandwiches, tuna salad and their latest innovation, the kimchi beef sandwich, made with kimchi, a fiery Korean pickled cabbage.

    Lately a new convenience store in the neighborhood has been trying to lure customers away from them by offering obento, a type of box lunch to go popular with harried office workers and construction crews alike. The Yonekuras have retaliated by hauling their family rice cooker out to the front counter and making obento themselves. Mrs. Yonekura confides without ever referring to their competitor that "The Japanese like to eat rice with their lunch. We tried a rice sandwich but it didn't sell too well, so we think obento are a good idea."

    The Yonekura shop is one small part of a gigantic change that has affected Japanese nutrition and eating habits since the end of WW II. With it has come an almost unimaginable change in the Japanese body and an improvement in health. The elder Mrs. Yonekura is typical of the pre-WW II generation. Because of severe calcium deficiency in her youth, she is bent nearly double and walks with a cane, the top of her body almost parallel to the ground. Before the war the Japanese diet lacked even the most basic vitamins, proteins and minerals, including, of course, calcium. The Japanese grew up short and stocky, and most older Japanese are sickly compared to their American and European counterparts.

    Kimiyoshi Kano, a retired financial officer, stands tall and straight despite his almost 80 years. "When I was a child, whenever we had fish, my father made me eat all the bones. I hated it at the time, but I'm very grateful to him now. He wasn't a doctor or anything, but he knew a thing or two about nutrition." The famous Japanese novel "The Makioka Sisters" opens with a scene of the girls giving each other injections of vitamin B to ward off beriberi. Despite much talk in the W

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