Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthDiseases & ConditionsCancer · 1 decade ago

symptoms=leukemia? acute lymphoblastic?

-sore joints in my feet and knees and wrists

-anemia

-heavy bleeding

-weird bruises

-constant tiredness(I need sleep all the time)

Does that add up to acute lymphoblastic leukemia

3 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There is a chance that your symptoms are related to leukemia but it's not a very common diagnosis. Based on your other question I see you are young and the constant tiredness is not uncommon for teenagers. Sore joints may be due to some growth and your bleeding/bruising may be caused by your anemia. Still, it's important for you to see a doctor before you diagnose yourself or before you become sicker if it is more serious.

    ALL is an acute leukemia, which is considered a medical emergency. Patients diagnosed with either of the acute leukemias (ALL & AML) need to begin treatment very soon after diagnosis - usually within the first 48 hours - in order to have a chance of a better outcome. It's not possible to type the leukemia without a CBC blood count.

    I have met many children with ALL over the last 2 1/2 years but I know more about AML - the two are closely related. My son E was diagnosed with a Wilms' Tumour as a newborn, won his battle, and was recently diagnosed with Secondary Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML). AML is related to ALL but is still quite different. His cancer is most likely a secondary cancer caused by the chemotherapy his first time when he fought Wilms. E somehow passed his screenings he has every 3 months back in October but in the end of November we started to notice he wasn't quite himself, and he was diagnosed December 19th.

    There are lots of symptoms of leukemia but each individual is different. Some display some symptoms while others display other ones. There's no actual tumour as in other cancers but leukemia is a cancer of the cells that create blood cells. E had a cold in November that he just couldn't kick. We took him to the doctor and he was given an antibiotic. He got a little better but as soon as he finished the antibiotic he got sick again. He usually has a couple bruises here and there since he is a 2 year old. His walking was greatly affected from one of the drugs in his first chemo cocktail so he trips and falls pretty often. But the bruising he had was more than usual - he bruised at the slightest bump. That's when we really knew something was wrong and took him to the doctor again. Once he was diagnosed we found out that his spleen and liver were enlarged - also symptoms of leukemia. Due to the extent of enlargement of his spleen, he had it removed after a round of chemotherapy. So far he has had 3 strong doses of induction chemo and 2 consolidation rounds, and he's labeled as being in remission! He still has 3-5 rounds of consolidation chemo left just to make sure all of the cancerous cells are gone.

    During chemotherapy, Eli has a horrible time with nausea and vomiting. He has tried several anti-nausea drugs to help him such as Ativan, Zofran, Kytril, or even Benedryl. The Zofran seems to work best for him although Ativan does take away the nausea - it just sedates him to the point he barely speaks for 24hrs after the dose.

    He will also have a bone marrow transplant when a donor becomes available. Chemotherapy is necessary in all acute leukemias but a bone marrow transplant (BMT) is not always necessary. A BMT is still technically considered an experimental procedure but can be recommended for patients especially if remission was not achieved in the first induction round, if he or she has had a previous cancer, or if the patient is at high risk of relapse. A BMT is coupled with very high doses of chemotherapy to kill off the vast majority of the patient's "bad" bone marrow so that the donor marrow has a chance to graft and take over once transplanted.

    He had some joint pain at the time of diagnosis. I have to say I didn't really think too much of the joint pain because he doesn't walk well due to one of the previous chemotherapy drugs he had - Vincristine. Because of Vincristine his leg muscles are weaker and he walks with "slapfoot" or "dropfoot" and he trips and falls fairly often. I figured his joint pain was because of falling but since his diagnosis I now see that it was probably because of the leukemia. On treatment he has had a significant amount of bone and joint pain, especially early on. When it's clear that he is in pain, he does get pain meds to help. I think the painkillers do help him but I think even then he does have some pain but duller than without painkillers.

    A leukemia diagnosis is absolutely not a death sentence. It's treatable but you have to keep in mind that it does take lives. I know many children and adults that have gone on to live completely normal lives after getting their No Evidence of Disease (NED) status. Sometimes a patient does relapse but it is absolutely possible that he or she can reach remission and eventually NED status.

    I hope this helped you out some and I hope your symptoms are nothing serious. If you have any more questions feel free to email me (crazycanuckj@yahoo.ca) or IM me (crazycanuckj).

    Source(s): My 2 year old son is a warrior who beat a Wilms' Tumour and is currently battling Secondary Acute Myelogenous Leukemia. http://www.caringbridge.com/visit/warrioreli
  • dueitt
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Hi, You quite must speak to the medical professionals who've been treating her. There is plenty of expertise on the web however seeking to realize what it approach is tricky. Each case will also be one-of-a-kind. One desk suggests a forty to 60% survival fee for bone marrow transplant sufferers after 6 years. The graph is flat at that factor , so it indicates that if you are making it 6 years you may also are living decades after that. They dont have a tendency to speak approximately remedies with melanoma . They speak approximately remissions , relapses and survival premiums. From the stuff on the web it sort of feels a specific sort of bone marrow transplant has the first-rate healing premiums. The health practitioner can supply you a greater knowledge of the health problem, and any regulations there maybe for the longer term. Good good fortune some thing you make a decision. Dont be ashamed if you make a decision that you simply cant marry the woman. It may be very tough to manage that variety of quandary at a really younger age . Do check out regardless that to be there for her as a buddy .

  • 1 decade ago

    How old are you?

    A.L.L. is the childrens version of Leukaemia - adults tend to have the chronic type.

    But yes, those do sound like the symptoms, together with weight loss, sometimes a bloated tummy as the liver and the spleen can swell up. The reason you get sore feet and legs generally is because it is a cancer of the bone marrow, basically.

    You need to ask you doctor for a blood test, including a full blood count.

    Source(s): My son had A.L.L. when he was 3.
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.